Lymphatic Lab

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The Lymphatic System
Laszlo Vass, Ed.D.Version 42-0024-00-01

Lab RepoRt assistant

This document is not meant to be a substitute for a formal laboratory report. The Lab Report Assistant is simply a summary of the experiment’s questions, diagrams if needed, and data tables that should be addressed in a formal lab report. The intent is to facilitate students’ writing of lab reports by providing this information in an editable file which can be sent to an instructor. Purpose

A. What was the purpose of doing this exercise?

The purpose of this lab is to name the components and functions of the lymphatic system, to describe the formation and composition of the lymph, relate the function of the lymphatic system to that of the cardiovascular system, to describe structure and function of lymph nodes, T-Cells, B-Cells, and Macrophages, to differentiate between an antigen and an antibody, to perform an antigen-antibody test and interpret results from that test, and to discuss how the immune response is triggered by using various albumin samples to explore the antigen-antibody reaction.

Exercise 1: Microscopic Anatomy of Lymphatic Structures

A.Sketch of Reticular Connective Tissue Slide (Lymph Node). Describe the structures you observed on the slide.

the outermost capsule, extensions of the capsule into the node called trabeculae, the outer globular looking tissue known as the cortex, and the inner medulla.

B.Sketch of Spleen Slide: Describe the structures you observed on the slide. Observe the online slide and look for areas of lymphocytes suspended in the reticular fibers. This is called white pulp. The remaining tissue is called red pulp which has reticular tissue and veins running through out. The white pulp serves the spleen’s immune function and the red pulp is where macrophages remove old and dying red blood cells, debris, toxins, bacteria and viruses from the blood flowing through.

C. Sketch of Tonsil Slide: Describe the structures you observed on the slide. Examine the online slide and look for the follicles which contain germinal centers surrounded by lymphocytes. The tonsil contains invaginated folds called crypts which trap bacteria and other foreign material. The bacteria are then sent to the lymph nodes for destruction.

D.Sketch of Thymus Slide: Describe the structures you observed on the slide.

Exercise 2: Immunity and the Immune Respose

A. Describe what happened to the red and green food coloring after 45 minutes.

B. Which sera was an antigen in section 2 of the dish? Describe what you observed in section 2 of the dish.

C. Which sera was the antigen in the “unknown” sample used in section 3 of the dish? Describe what you observed in section 3 of the dish.

Questions
Exercise 1: Microscopic Anatomy of Lymphatic Structures

A. How are lymph, lymphatic vessels and lymph nodes related? Lymph, lymphatic vessels and lymph nodes are related because they make up the lymphatic system. The lymphatic system transports tissue fluid (lymph) to the blood vessels and it protects the body by removing foreign material such as bacteria. The cells of the lymphatic system are specialized to protect and provide immunity against foreign invaders. Lymphatic structures include a series of lymphatic vessels that transport lymph and run parallel to the circulatory vessels, lymph nodes which are bean-shaped filters found periodically through the network of vessels as well as tonsils, the thymus gland and the spleen.

B. What are the two major functions of the lymph nodes?
One of the functions of the lymphatic system is to provide us with immunity against foreign cells and other invaders. Lymph nodes filter potentially harmful foreign particles from the lymph before it is returned to the bloodstream. Lymph nodes are centers for the production of lymphocytes that act against foreign particles. They contain macrophages...
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