Lucretia Mott

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Tiffany Polite
Prof. Lietner
March 20, 2013
History 1

Lucretia Mott

(Martin)

Lucretia Mott was born on January 3, 1793 in Nantucket, Massachusetts. She was born to Ana Folger and Thomas Coffin. Her parents had eight children. When Mott was thirteen she was sent to a Quaker Boarding school in Dutchess County, NY. After she graduated she became a teacher there. Once Mott discovered that males were paid three times more than females she became very interested in woman’s rights. Mott was antislavery, and because she believed that she refused to use any slavery produced products. (Wikipedia, 2013) With her husband’s support and help. She became a Quaker minister and traveled giving sermons emphasizing the Quaker inward light or the divine within every individual. In 1833 once Mott was an established abolitionist and minister she was the only woman to speak at the convention in Philadelphia. In 1833 Mott and her husband also founded the American Anti-Slavery Association. In June 1840 Mott attended the General Anti-Slavery Convention, better known as the World's Anti-Slavery Convention, in London, England. In spite of Mott's status as one of six women delegates, before the conference began, the men voted to exclude the American women from participating, and the female delegates were required to sit in a segregated area. Anti-Slavery leaders didn't want the women's rights issue to become associated with the cause of ending slavery worldwide and dilute the focus on abolition. (Wikipedia, 2013) With all the busyness going on in Mott’s life she found time to marry James Mott on April 10, 1811. They produced six children but one of their children died at the young age of two years old. The rest of their children they raised up with their political and religious beliefs and the children became involved in the anti-slavery movement. (Wikipedia, 2013) Lucretia Mott was in many organizations and believed that slavery was wrong. She believed that woman should...
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