Lpc & Path-Goal Theories

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Compare and contrast between the Feidler’s Least Preferred Coemployee scale (LPC) and Path-Goal theories of leadership Fiedler’s  Contingency
 Theory
 of
 Leadership
 states
 that
 there
 is
 no
 one
 best
 style
  of
 leadership.
 Instead,
 the
 effectiveness
 of
 a
 leader
 depends
 on
 the
 person’s
  leadership
 style
 and
 situational
 favorableness.
 
 
  Fiedler
 believed
 that
 leadership
 style
 is
 fixed
 and
 can
 be
 measured
 by
 a
 Least-­‐ Preferred
 Co-­‐Worker
 (LPC)
 scale.
 The
 scale
 is
 a
 questionnaire
 consisting
 of
 16
  items
 used
 to
 reflect
 a
 leader’s
 underlying
 disposition
 toward
 others.
 Each
 item
  in
 the
 scale
 is
 given
 a
 single
 ranking
 of
 between
 one
 and
 eight
 points,
 with
 eight
  points
 indicating
 the
 most
 favorable
 rating.
 
  The
 high
 LPC
 score
 leaders
 derived
 most
 satisfaction
 from
 interpersonal
  relationships
 and
 therefore
 evaluate
 their
 least
 preferred
 co-­‐workers
 in
 fairly
  favorable
 terms.
 These
 leaders
 think
 about
 the
 task
 accomplishment
 only
 after
  the
 relationship
 need
 is
 well
 satisfied.
 On
 the
 other
 hand,
 the
 low
 LPC
 score
  leaders
 derived
 satisfaction
 from
 performance
 of
 the
 task
 and
 attainment
 of
  objectives
 and
 only
 after
 tasks
 have
 been
 accomplished,
 these
 leaders
 work
 on
  establishing
 good
 social
 and
 interpersonal
 relationships.
 
  According
 to
 Fiedler,
 a
 leader’s
 behavior
 is
 dependent
 upon
 the
 favorability
 of
  the
 leadership
 situation.
 Three
 factors
 work
 together
 to
 determine
 how
  favorable
 a
 situation
 is
 to
 a
 leader.
 These
 are:
 
  • Leader-­‐member
 relations
 -­‐
 The
 degree
 to
 which
 the
 leaders
 is
 trusted
 and
  liked
 by
 the
 group
 members,
 and
 the
 willingness
 of
 the
 group
 members
 to
  follow
 the
 leader’s
 guidance
  • Task
 structure
 -­‐
 The
 degree
 to
 which
 the
 group’s
 task
 has
 been
 described
  as
 structured
 or
 unstructured,
 has
 been
 clearly
 defined
 and
 the
 extent
 to
  which
 it
 can
 be
 carried
 out
 by
 detailed
 instructions
  • Position
 power
 -­‐
 The
 power
 of
 the
 leader
 by
 virtue
 of
 the
 organizational
  position
 and
 the
 degree
 to
 which
 the
 leader
 can
 exercise
 authority
 on
  group
 members
 in
 order
 to
 comply
 with
 and
 accept
 his
 direction
 and
  leadership
 
  With
 the
 help
 of
 these
 three
 variables,
 Fiedler
 constructed
 eight
 combinations
 of
  group-­‐task
 situations.
 These
 combinations
 were
 used
 to
 identify
 the
 style
 of
 the
  leader.
 Fiedler
 also
 suggested
 that
 leaders
 may
 act
 differently
 in
 different
  situations.
 Relationship-­‐oriented
 leaders
 generally
 display
 task-­‐oriented
  behaviors
 under
 highly
 favorable
 situations
 and
 display
 relationship-­‐oriented
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