Love Is a Simple Word but Hard to Understand

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Love is a word that is simple, little difficult to define using just a synonym, and can often be even more difficult to measure and understand. Wellington was stabbed with a pitched fork, there was no other visible evidence at the scene of the crime. A math geek like Christopher could use Math to help in understanding and solving the very complicated murder of Wellington – a poodle who lives across the street. Yet, Christopher would have great difficulties in understanding what love is all about (“Then I felt reading the letter because I felt sick…..I tried really hard to think if there wa any other explanation, but I couldn’t think of one – Page 112”) Only love could explain why Ed, Christopher’s Dad hide the reality from Chris for so long. “I did it for your good, Christopher. Honestly, I did. I never meant to lie…..Page 114”). Love is something that even the most celebrated genius like Albert Einstein had problems in defining. No wonder, it took Judy Boone, mother of Christopher, 43 letters to explain what love is all about. Except just before Judy sign off in each letter, there weren’t too many expressions of love in all the 43 letters. It is clear that those letters were not written because of the feeling of guilt or responsibility. No amount of guilt without love could consistently motivate a mother to write letters to her son. Judy mentioned many unimportant things about her routine and what’s happening in the office in many of those letters. Knowingly that such trivial had little meaning to her little autistic son, she still took the painstaking effort to talk about her routine and life. (“We had a fridge and cooker at last…….Page 104”) It would be justifiable for any critic to comment that it was Judy’s way of expressing remorse and a feeling of guilt for writing those lengthy 43 letters to Chris. Any jury could not deny that without a strong love and bond that Judy had for his son, no amount of guilt or remorse could persist in writing...
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