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Business Driven Information Systems, Third Edition

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Ebusiness: Electronic Business Value
SECTION 3.1 W EB 1.0: Ebusiness SECTION 3.2 WEB 2.0: Business 2.0

CHAPTER

3



D i s r u p t i v e Te c h n o l o g i e s a n d W e b 1. 0 Ad va n t a ge s o f E b u s i n e s s Ebusiness Models E b u s i n e s s To o l s f o r C o n n e c t i n g and Communicating The Challenges of Ebusiness



We b 2 . 0 : Ad va n t a ge s o f Business 2.0 N e t wo rk i n g C o m m u n i t i e s w i t h Business 2.0 B u s i n e s s 2 . 0 To o l s f o r Collaborating The Challenges of Business 2.0 We b 3 . 0 : D e f i n i n g t h e N e x t Generation of Online Business Opportunities

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What’s in IT for Me?
Internet and communication technologies have revolutionized the way business operates, improving upon traditional methods and even introducing new opportunities and ventures that were simply not possible before. More than just giving organizations another means of conducting transactions, online business provides the ability to develop and maintain customer relationships, supplier relationships, and even employee relationships between and within enterprises. As future managers and organizational knowledge workers, you need to understand the benefits ebusiness can offer an organization and your career, the challenges that accompany Web technologies and their impact on organizational communication and collaboration. You need to be aware of the strategies organizations can use to deploy ebusiness and the methods of measuring ebusiness success. This chapter will give you this knowledge and help prepare you for success in tomorrow’s electronic global marketplace.

CHAPTER OUTLINE

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IFSM 300

opening case study

Social Media and Ashton Kutcher
Where celebrities go, fans follow. The truism applies as much in social media as in the real world, David Karp noticed after famous artists began using his blogging service Tumblr. As a result, encouraging celebrities to set up accounts on the site has become “absolutely part of our road map and our business plan,” Karp says. In fact, he recently hired a full-time employee to help high-profile users design and manage their blogs. It’s no secret that well-recognized players in a host of fields—from acting to athletics, music to politics—are using social media sites to connect with fans and promote their brands. Celebrities used to seek out promotion “in People magazine or Vogue,” says Robert Passikoff, president of Brand Keys, a researcher that tracks the value of celebrity brands. “It’s now become a necessity to have a Facebook page.” But the benefits go both ways. Sites benefit greatly from the online cavalcade of stars. Oprah Winfrey’s recent debut on microblogging service Twitter sent visits to the site skyrocketing 43 percent over the previous week, according to analytics firm Hitwise. Facebook, Google’s YouTube, Ning, and other Web 2.0 destinations have also seen swarms of activity around the profile pages of their famous members. And like Tumblr, social sites are going out of their way to keep the celebrities happy and coming back.

Obama on MySpace, Facebook, and Twitter
The Obama administration created profile pages on MySpace, Facebook, and Twitter. To accommodate 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue, News Corp.’s MySpace agreed to build ad-free pages and equipped the profile to get automatic updates from the White House’s official blog. In some cases social networks give VIPs a heads-up on changes. Recently, Facebook worked with the handlers of select celebrity members, including CBS news anchor Katie Couric and French President Nicolas Sarkozy, to get feedback on the new design of the site before it was opened to the public. “We don’t have a formalized support program for public figures, but we do offer some support,” says Facebook spokeswoman Brandee Barker. Some privileged members of Facebook have also been assigned “vanity URLs,” or short,...
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