Lord of the Flies vs the Crucible

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Arthur Millers play, The Crucible, is a great example on how literature seeks to communicate power. Within the play, Miller tries to express a message to the reader. The message he tries to get across is that fear can make people do ridiculous things. The people of Salem were so afraid of witches'; anything that was out of the ordinary would be considered witchcraft. The people would accuse Mr. Jacobs, an old man that could barely walk, of climbing into a small girls window with a black man whispering in his ear. Giles Corey Wife would also be accused of witchcraft just because Giles said he was curious about the books she was reading. Arthur Miller creates total chaos in Salem to display a message to the general public that in times of crisis, people must remain calm and not jump to conclusions.

William Golding's Novel, Lord of the Flies, is a great display of what can happened to a society with no order. Golding creates a situation with boys between the ages of 6 and 12 stranded alone on an island. The boys cannot correctly choose a leader and also fail to create laws. They would split up into two separate groups due to their disagreements and the separation of the boys would severely hinder their attempts at being rescued from the island. The boy's island soon becomes chaos, which would lead to the death of two boys and the ultimate destruction of the island. Golding wrote the novel to explain to the reader why our society today has a system of order and rules. Without the rules and structure of our society, our country would spiral out of control into the pits of genocide and poverty.
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