Lord of the Flies- Simon's Character

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Simon is a character unlike anyone else; he stands on an entirely separate plane from all other boys. First of all, it is Simon who comprehends the true meaning of the beastie and the “mankind’s essential illness” (96). Only he realizes that this beast exists within each one of the boys and that their true reason for fear is because they do not want the beast to emerge from their unconscious minds and seize control of their thoughts. Apart from his wisdom, Simon also embodies innate goodness that seems beyond human, almost godly. He is repeatedly seen providing sustenance and lending a hand to the more insignificant people of the group, like the small children and Piggy. For instance, he is spotted picking ripe fruit for the little ones and passing the fruits “to the endless, outstretched hands” (57). He is also the one who recovers Piggy’s specs after Jack’s punch (75) and the one who gives his own share of meat to Piggy, even facing humiliation doing so (78). Throughout the novel, it becomes evident that most boys desert their moral ways as soon as the pressure from the adult world lifts. However, in Simon’s case, it seems that morality is something that is simply a part of him, not conditioned over the years by punishments of misdeeds. This immaculate righteousness and his tendency to serve others are similar to that of Jesus. In chapter seven, Simon attempts to reassure troubled Ralph claiming, “You’ll get back to where you came from… You’ll get back all right” (121). Ralph is slightly unnerved by Simon’s confidence in this matter, but feels consoled nevertheless. This apparent ability to prophesize is another factor that leads him back to a religious man. In conclusion, Simon is largely characterized by his compassion, morality, and ability to comprehend humanity, all factors that remind the readers of a god-like figure.
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