Lord of the Flies: Piggy's and Simon's Deaths

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In Lord of the Flies, by William Golding, Piggy’s death is a pivotal point in the novel, signifying the extinguishing of all traces of civilization and logic on the island as savagery, in one merciless act, takes the reigns of control on the island. Piggy’s murder is entirely and inarguably intentional, committed by Roger, a symbol of human nature’s inherent darkness--its pure, unadulterated savagery. Piggy’s character, on the other hand, is a source of light, the unwavering voice beneath Ralph’s campaigns for civilization, and is an advocate of logic and scientific reason. Both boys serve as advisors of sorts to their respective leaders--Piggy to Ralph and Roger to Jack. It is a consistent and almost fitting death in the novel’s larger theme of the struggles of civilization against savagery which is the dark side of human nature to which Golding shows civilization can quickly devolve. Savagery annihilates reason purposefully, swiftly and violently. Piggy’s death is different from Simon’s, ultimately more significant to the novel’s overarching message, although equally violent in nature. While Simon’s slaughter can hardly be attributed to accident, Simon’s murder closely resembled a hunt and a crime of temporary insanity more so than a cold-blooded murder. Simon is killed in the fever of excitement and the boys’ barbaric chants, their lusts for blood speaking louder than their swiftly diminishing tendencies toward reason. However, Piggy’s death cannot be mistaken for an accident of any sort. Roger, his killer, is a boy who had, from the start, consistently test the boundaries of conscience and civilization and quickly grown to disregard them entirely.

Piggy’s death, however, does not come entirely as a surprise, foreshadowed by the destruction of other entities that once stood as symbols of the power of civilization, each respective object and person meeting its demise at a devastatingly fitting point in the novel and each symbolizing further...
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