Lord of the Flies Essay

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“The Lord of the Flies” - Paper

Chaos: (n) A state of utter confusion or disorder; a total lack of organization or order. This explanation of a five letter word does not even begin to describe the situation that a group of British school boy experienced on an uninhibited island. They soon learn not long after landing on the island, that evil has a way of moving in for the kill, even if not visible. Evil exists within everyone and in the absence of rules; this evil side can take over, resulting in chaos. In the story, “The Lord of the Flies,” by William Golding, the tale of pure chaos is expressed through distinct symbolism, a graphic setting and vivid characterization.

William Golding uses symbolism several times in his story to support the theme. The most discussed symbol in the book has to be the conch shell. From the beginning of the boys’ arrival, the conch shell was a symbol of authority and power. When the boys wanted to say something, they needed the power of the conch to be heard over the rest of the group. The system of using the conch worked for a long time, and when all the boys respected it, order was present. By the end of the story, the conch is destroyed. “… the conch exploded into a thousand white fragments and ceased to exist,(P. 181, The Lord of the Flies).” And with the conch, goes all of the sanity in the tribe. The beastie that the children are afraid of is a symbol of the evil that is in each of them. They think that they can hunt it down; when they group itself is what’s killing them. And last, the lightness and darkness is a symbol in the book for the evil that is building in the group. In the beginning of the story the island is described as a beautiful place that is covered in sunshine and warmth. As the book goes in, Golding quits talking about its beauty and describes it as a dark and scary place and that there are storms and that the island is basically hell. Symbolism is a big part in this book, especially when Golding is...
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