Lord Chesterfield

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Lord Chesterfield lived in the 18th century. He had a career in public affairs and was married to Melusina von Schulemberg, they had no children. However, he had a son named Philip. Chesterfield wrote to his illegitimate son for years. The purpose of these writings was to teach the boy elegance. This particular letter explains how the boy should not waist his life. He should value every word of advice he is told. Chesterfield uses rhetorical strategies to reveal his own values in the letter.

In the first paragraph, there is a parallel structured sentence. It reads “moroseness, the imperiousness, or the garrulity of” (line 7). Chesterfield is explaining how he understands advice does not always want to be heard, no matter how important it may be. This rhetorical device helps to reveal his values because it amplifies his feelings toward the advice he’s giving. There are also two similes in the first paragraph, “dictate as a parent” (line 17) and “advise as a friend”. These similes are addressing the same thing. Chesterfield doesn’t want to command Philip to do anything such as a parent would, but he strongly suggests it. This rhetorical device helps the reader determine the author’s personality, gentle yet firm.

Towards the end of the first paragraph, there is an effective, colossal metaphor. It is “of those thorns and briars which scratched and disfigured me” (lines 23- 24). This rhetorical device refers to old age and bad choices. It can be argued as a hyperbole because it is doubtful to actually happen, but is effective as a choice of words. It shows that, as an older person, he knows the importance of how choices can alter your life. There is also an allusion in paragraph one. It reads “womanish weakness for your person” (lines 28- 29). This shows that Chesterfield has little parental love for Philip. The context of the rhetorical device is explaining that he’s always been concerned for his well-being.

In the second paragraph a hyperbole is used,...
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