Looking for Alaska by John Green Critique Essay

Only available on StudyMode
  • Download(s) : 330
  • Published : May 1, 2013
Open Document
Text Preview
The novel, Looking for Alaska by John Green was written in 2005. By 2006, it won the Michael L. Printz award from the American Library Association and placed number ten on the New York Times bestseller list. In the chapters entitled “The Day After” and “Two Days After,” Green describes how Miles Halter and Alaska’s closest friends react to her sudden death. Throughout these chapters, Green’s style includes realism, literal imagery, diction, and voice in a hope to enable his audience to reach relation and understanding. Although Green’s writing style is very profound in this novel, his story plot and characters sometimes lack originality. John Green inputs realism within the two chapters to influence the reader to relate directly to the scene he is describing. “She’s not dead. She’s alive. She’s alive somewhere. She’s in the woods. Alaska is hiding in the woods and she’s not dead. She’s just hiding. She’s playing a trick on us.” (140). He writes the protagonist’s repetitive thoughts to accurately portray what someone who had just lost a loved one would actually think and the doubt that they would carry. Green wants the reader to realize how much you would like to deny the death of someone so close to you, and he does so by writing in such a real and true way. Embedded into Green’s writing is an enormous amount of literal imagery. For example, “but I could only see her lying naked on a metal table, a small trickle of blood falling out of her half-teardrop nose, her green eyes open, staring off into the distance, her mouth turned up just Jenkins 2

enough to suggest the idea of a smile, and she had felt so warm against me, her mouth soft and warm on mine” (141). Green creates vivid rhetorical images through his way of words alone. He uses many descriptive words, effectively, to help the reader visualize Alaska dead and Miles still dreaming of her. Similarly, Green’s figurative diction stimulates the reader’s imagination. For instance, “it...
tracking img