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Chapter 2
Review of Related Literature and Studies

Introduction

In today’s modern times, computer technology has become a vital part of our life. It helps us to have an easier life. In this competing world, the students should have to learn a lot when it comes to education. Everything cannot be taught by a teacher or in school. To face big challenges in life, students take up extra learning which can be done through computers. These computers can be used for their personal or recreational activities like listening to music, watching movies or videos, chatting, browsing, playing games and etc. We can express our feelings through it.

The work of the students became easier in searching information they want to learn. Technology has been part of our life like language, ritual values, arts and more. It also affects our ways of thinking that can contribute to a more progressive country. The computer technology provides an opportunity for students with the physical, emotional, and mental disabilities to acquire universal access to tools and opportunities for learning.

Effects of Being Varsity on the academic performance of the students in N.U 6.

Foreign Studies

Current scholarly knowledge about the relationship between sports and academic performance derives from and is based upon a long-term, multifaceted body of research and writing. Much of the inspiration for this work came from James Coleman’s classic The Adolescent Society (1961) which posited the powerful impact of interscholastic athletics in general and athletes in particular on American high school culture. Though focused on peer group dynamics and institutional effects and somewhat critical of the status of sport as related to the academic mission of schools, Coleman’s work gave rise to numerous academic studies of the relationship between athletic participation and education for individual students and student-athletes (Cf. Rehberg and Schaefer 1968; Spady 1970; Hanks and Eckland 1976; Otto and Alwin 1977; Landers and Landers 1978). The basic result of this work was to establish a strong and positive baseline correlation between high school sports participation and academic achievement. Students who participate in high school sports tend, on average or in general, to perform better academically than their non-athletic peers.

Effects of Being Varsity on the academic performance of the students in N.U 7. Foreign Literature

Scholars have taken many different approaches to the challenge of analyzing and unpacking the basic, positive correlation between interscholastic sports participation and individual educational outcomes. For some, the primary objective is to try to estimate or determine the magnitude of sport’s impact on academic achievement. In a recent econometric analysis, for example, Lipscomb (2006) found that high school sports participation resulted in a two percent (2%) increase in standardized math and science test scores on a national survey sample, net of other background factors and social variables. Moreover, student-athletes were five percent (5%) more likely to aspire to college attendance than their non-athletic peers (a number that doubled to 10% if sports participation was paired with some other form or forms of extracurricular participation). For others, the approach is more comparative, situating the academic impact of sport in relation to other school activities and pursuits. Such analyses, as mentioned above (see, once again, Barber, Eccles, and Stone 2001; Eccles and Barber 1999; and March 1992), have yielded results that are encouraging for sports advocates and practitioners eager to tout the educational potential of sports; however, these studies also tend, perhaps appropriately, to be somewhat less precise and definitive in their claims and conclusions. Such assessments of magnitude and significance assume, almost by definition a direct, causal link...
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