London Underground Lesson

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  • Topic: London Underground, Tube map, Oyster card
  • Pages : 8 (2115 words )
  • Download(s) : 132
  • Published : January 22, 2013
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The Tube (the familiar name for the London Underground) is full of English. In this clip, I managed to collect some of the best known samples for YouTube. Filming in the Underground without permission is highly illegal. I risked my freedom for this lesson plan so I hope you enjoy it.

◦Language level: Elementary; Pre-intermediate (A2)

◦Learner type: Teens; Adults

◦Time: 45 minutes

◦Activity: Matching collocations; Reading signs

◦Topic: London; Transport

◦Language: Noun + noun collocations; Passive; Infinitive of purpose

◦Materials: Video; Worksheet

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|How to use the london underground- youtube | | | |[pic] | |The London tube is a subway train system serving the city and suburbs of London. The tube is a smart, safe, cheap way to get around | |London -- use it to see the tourist sights or hop on and ride to understand how the city is laid out. There are 275 tube stations (63 in| |central London) -- it seems as if there is a tube stop everywhere, once you're looking. | |Opened in 1890, the London tube is the oldest underground in the world, and entire blogs are dedicated to its current workings and | |history. Some detail current stoppages and delays, which drive many locals nuts; just relax and enjoy the ride if you're a traveler. | |Read on to learn how to use the London underground. | | | |London has a total of 12 tube lines with trains running every few minutes between 5:30-3:30 a.m. Monday through Saturday, and 7:30-11:30| |on Sundays, according to the official London Underground. Finding your way to the right tube station and the tube stop you need is | |remarkably easy, even without your own tube maps. | |You'll want a tube map, though -- get free tube maps at any underground station office. You can check out free tube maps online before | |you go, but you needn't download one to carry across the pond -- tube maps are easy to grab at any train station, and you'll find tube | |maps posted generously on station walls. | |Download official London tube maps | |London tube maps for iPod and iPhone |

When you hit your first London tube station (used to be Waterloo, above, and is now St. Pancras if you're coming in on the Eurostar train from France or Belgium), you'll see signs everywhere -- overhead and on the walls -- telling you what to do and where to buy London tube tickets. Tube workers are hanging around at ticket windows, ready to sell you passes and explain what you need -- they're also manning turnstiles leading to tube tunnels, through which you can't pass until you've got a tube ticket.

One ticket equals one tube ride, which is great if you're going one place (and you know how to get there). Otherwise, buy a one or several day London tube passes or a credit card-sized Oyster card, which gives you a set amount of rides for at least a week, works on central London buses and segments of National Rail trains, and is hard to lose. My one-week Oyster pass was about...
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