Lollipop

Only available on StudyMode
  • Download(s) : 59
  • Published : December 5, 2012
Open Document
Text Preview
WHAT IS BLASPHEMY ?

Blasphemy is the act of insulting or showing contempt or lack of reverence for a religious deity or the irreverence towards religious or holy persons or things . Some countries have laws to punish blasphemy while others have laws to give recourse to those who are offended by blasphemy .
HOW DID IT START

As religions are formed , blasphemy comes with it . There are people who accept it and people who don’t . Blasphemy is in every country . Certain laws have been made in easch country if cases like these appear .

LAWS FOR BLASPHEMY IN OTHER RELIGIONS

Christianity
In Britain's last blasphemy execution, 20-year-old Thomas Aikenhead was executed for the crime in 1697. He was prosecuted for denying the veracity of the Old Testament and the legitimacy of Christ's miracles. Islam

Blasmphemy has not been mentioned in the Quran .Muslim jurists made the offence part of Sharia : the penalties for blasphemy can include fines , imprisonment ,flogging , amputation hanging , or beheading .Muslim clerics may call for the pumishment of an alleged blasphemer by issuing fatwa . Judaism

According to Judaism , it has been stated that that thepeople who commit blasphemy would be put to death . The seven laws of Noah , which Judaism sees as applicable to all people, prohibit blasphemy .
CURRENT ISSUES OF BLASPHEMY
A lawyer representing the man who accused a Pakistani Christian girl of blasphemy has said that if she is not convicted, Muslims could "take the law into their own hands". Rao Abdur Raheem cited the example of Mumtaz Qadri, the man who last year shot dead a politician who had called for reform of the much-abused blasphemy law. The apparent hijacking of the case against Rimsha Masih by organised extremists, including lawyers, could further complicate a bitterly contentious case. The lawyer's comments are likely to further complicate a bitterly contentious case that has caused an international outcry and embarrassed the Pakistani government. It could intimidate the court and would put her life at further risk even if she is freed. The girl, Rimsha Masih, from Mehrabadi, Islamabad, whose family says she is 11, was arrested this month and charged with desecrating the Qur'an after a neighbour, Malik Hammad, claimed that he saw her with burnt pages of the holy text in a bag she was carrying. Her family had hoped that she would be granted bail on Thursday after a medical report this week found that she was a minor – thus eligible for bail – and had learning difficulties. But those hopes were dashed whenRaheem challenged the report and the hearing was postponed. According to Raheem, the medical report on Masih was illegal, as it followed the orders of a civil servant and not the court, and went beyond its remit of determining her age. He accused the government of supporting her and manipulating court proceedings. Speaking outside the Islamabad court after the hearing, Raheem said: "There are many Mumtaz Qadris in this country … This [medical] report has been managed by the state, state agencies and the accused." The case has caused an international outcry. Later, sitting in his office beneath a large poster of Qadri, Raheem told the Guardian: "If the court is not allowed to do its work, because the state is helping the accused, then the public has no other option except to take the law into their own hands." There is however a glimmer of hope. In this case, for the first time in the case hardline Islamic clerics have cautioned against presuming the guilt of Rimsha Masih. Last night one of PakistanN's most radical mullahs, Ahmed Ludhianvi, head of the banned Sipah-e-Sahaba, which is blamed for hundreds of sectarian killings, told the Guardian: "There should be a thorough investigation. If she [Masih] didn't do it, she should be freed. If she is mentally...
tracking img