Lok Pal Bill

Only available on StudyMode
  • Topic: Manmohan Singh, Lok Sabha, Government of India
  • Pages : 12 (3169 words )
  • Download(s) : 2624
  • Published : June 28, 2011
Open Document
Text Preview
Jan Lokpal Bill
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Lokpal. (Discuss) Proposed since June 2011.

In India, the Jan Lokpal Bill (Hindi: जन लोकपाल विधेयक) (also referred to as the citizens' ombudsman bill) is a proposed anti-corruption law designed to effectively deter corruption, redress grievances and protect whistleblowers. The law would create an ombudsman called the Jan Lokpal; this would be an independent body similar to the Election Commission of India with the power to prosecute politicians and bureaucrats without prior government permission.[1]

The bill was collaboratively drafted by Shanti Bhushan, retired Indian Police Service officer Kiran Bedi[citation needed], Justice N. Santosh Hegde, advocate Prashant Bhushan, and former chief election commissioner J. M. Lyngdoh, in wide public consultation with the leaders of the India Against Corruption movement and civil society. The original bill was mooted[clarification needed] by the National Campaign for Peoples’ Right to Information (NCPRI) in its delegated committee.[citation needed] The bill proposes the institution of the office of Lokpal (Ombudsman) at the center and local Lokayukta at the state level.

According to the Government of India Lokpal website, bill draft version 2.3 is finally accepted and under consideration. This version includes format, flow, formal structure, a table of contents and corrected drafting flaws and errors (corrected by Ramarao Velury).

For 42 years, the government-drafted bill has failed to pass the Rajya Sabha, the upper house of the Parliament of India.[2] The first Lokpal Bill was passed in the 4th Lok Sabha, the lower house of the Parliament, in 1969 but stalled in the Rajya Sabha. Subsequent Lokpal bills were introduced in 1971, 1977, 1985, 1989, 1996, 1998, 2001, 2005 and 2008 but all failed to pass.[3] Following the four day Anna Hazare fasting struggle,[clarification needed] Prime Minister Manmohan Singh stated that the Lokpal Bill would be introduced in the 2011 monsoon session of parliament.[4] Contents


1 Background
2 Key features of proposed bill
3 Difference between the proposals
4 Protests
5 Notable supporters
6 Government response
7 Drafting Committee
7.1 Chairmen
7.2 Government representation
7.3 Civil society representation
8 Criticisms of the Jan Lokpal Bill
9 See also
10 References
11 External links

[edit] Background

Renewed calls for a Jan Lokpal Bill arose over resentment of the major differences between the draft 2010 Lokpal Bill prepared by the government and the Jan Lokpal Bill prepared by the members of this movement, N. Santosh Hegde, a former justice of the Supreme Court of India and Lokayukta of Karnataka, Prashant Bhushan, a senior lawyer in the Supreme Court along with the members of the India Against Corruption movement. This movement has also been joined by many people providing their support in Internet social media such as Twitter and Facebook. In addition to spiritual leaders Sri Sri Ravi Shankar, Swami Ramdev, Swami Agnivesh and former Indian cricketer Kapil Dev,[5] many celebrities showed their public support through micro-blogging site Twitter[6] which has received significant public support. The bill's backers consider existing laws too weak and insufficiently enforced to stop corruption.[7][8] [edit] Key features of proposed bill

To establish a central government anti-corruption institution called Lokpal, supported by Lokayukta at the state level. As in the case of the Supreme Court and Cabinet Secretariat, the Lokpal will be supervised by the Cabinet Secretary and the Election Commission. As a result, it will be completely independent of the government and free from ministerial influence in its investigations. Members will be appointed by judges, Indian Administrative Service officers with...
tracking img