Logan Airports

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CASE STUDY REPORT In the Delays at Logan Airport case, there are different proposals for reducing congestion. One of the methods proposed to tackle the impact of delays was peak-period pricing, PPP. The other one was to build a new runway. In this case study, your objective is to evaluate these alternatives using waiting line models and to provide a recommendation to FAA to solve the delay problem at Logan Airport. Make sure you demonstrate that you have thought through your recommendations and the effects on other related activities. Also demonstrate that you understand the concepts and tools from the class that apply. Prepare an action-oriented advisory report, which presents concisely your analysis and recommendations for solution of the primary management problems. In order to assist you in your analysis, we prepared the discussion questions. DO NOT SIMPLY ANSWER THE DISCUSSION QUESTIONS. The main body of the case study report should not exceed 5-pages typewritten, one-andhalf-spaced, using default margins and 12-point type. In addition to the main body, you can attach an appendix that includes the details of the calculation, figures, tables, etc. The appendix itself should not exceed 2 pages. Your report should start with an executive summary (maximum 0.5 pages), which summarizes your recommendations and findings. The main body of the report should present a detailed discussion based on the provided questions and your analysis of the quantitative questions. Clearly state your assumptions. Be selective. Do not restate case facts. Summary tables in the text are encouraged for quantitative information. The details of the calculation can be put in the appendix, but any result that is important for answering questions or providing managerial insights should be referenced in the text. You may use figures to visually represent information contained in the text. Make sure tables and figures are referenced in the text. The following general guidelines are for your use in structuring your report. It is fine if you choose to structure it in another way. However, the page limit rules must be followed. General Guidelines An ideal case study report should be composed of four sections: (a) executive summary, (b) problem analysis, (c) detailed recommendations, and (d) limitations. Executive Summary State the major issues. If you do not intend to address all of the major problems in your recommendations, then indicate which one(s) you do intend to address. Use caution in your selection. Do not choose a minor problem with an obvious solution. Next, summarize your

recommendations. Indicate the results you expect. This section of the report should take from one to two paragraphs. Problem Analysis Provide any analysis necessary to support your statement of the problems. Indicate the significance or importance of the problems through discussion of their magnitude, urgency, difficulty, and/or possible consequences of a delay in addressing them. Discuss causal relationships whenever possible. You may include a discussion of secondary problems, as well. Indicate why you think these are secondary. Recommendations Give the details of your recommendations. Take a stand for action. Do not merely suggest "more study" or "call in a consultant." Direct your recommendations to eliminating the underlying causes, not merely minimizing or eliminating the symptoms. Indicate precisely how these will help to alleviate the problem. Provide supporting analysis. Include the most significant and relevant facts, assumptions and principles. Include computational support where appropriate. You may want to discuss major alternatives that you rejected with a brief explanation of your reasons for rejecting them. Discuss the results you expect in greater detail, give support, and indicate when you anticipate the realization of the benefits. Be realistic. Identify major costs necessary for implementation. (This should be the primary section.) Limitations...
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