Living in Big City

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Sample A ssessment Rubrics

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Introduction

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he following sample assessment rubrics can be modified by the teacher to match the unit activities of LOTE Checkpoint C. The sample rubrics define expectations for speaking and writing. Assessment rubrics should accomplish three goals: • inform the students of standards and expectations • inform the students about levels of achievement • inform the students about specific areas in need of improvement. Since the LOTE Checkpoint C level does not have formal standardized assessments, it is important that the teacher create some form of evaluation so that students are informed about their progress. Teachers are encouraged to modify the enclosed rubrics or create their own, so that grades are not the only form of student assessment. Checkpoint C classroom teachers may prefer to distribute assessment rubrics at the beginning of a unit, so that students are aware of expectations and understand how their work will be evaluated. The following rubrics, guidelines, and checklist are used in conjunction with the New York State LOTE assessments: • • • • • Informal Speaking Rubric Guidelines for Speaking Checkpoint C Writing Rubric Word Count Guidelines Writing Checklist.

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Speaking Rubric

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5

his rubric uses four 5-point scales (20 total points). Select some or all of the topics for assessment purposes. For example, vocabulary may be deleted or combined with another category.

Pronunciation
Phonetically correct Almost error-free Awareness of accent Genuine effort to sound like native speaker Comprehensible, generally correct Occasional error Frequent errors that confuse listener and require guessing at meaning Many errors that interfere with comprehensibility Most utterances contain errors Many utterances are incomprehensible Little communication No attempt 5

Fluency
Smooth flow Quick, continuous flow Natural pauses Occasional hesitation, searching for words Speaker can self-correct and respond to cues Halting, hesitating Visibly translating before responding Can rephrase and respond Frequent hesitations, searches for words Overly translates questions before response Repeats question word before response Eventually responds Constant searching for vocabulary, verb tense Does not complete utterances No attempt May repeat cue

4

4 3 2 1

3

2

0

1 0

Syntax
5 4 No grammatical errors Speaker self-corrects without hesitation Two or fewer syntax errors Minor errors that do not impede communication Frequent errors Self-corrects on some Many errors (agreement, verb forms) Errors in basic structures Errors impede communication Most structures incorrect Constant use of infinitive; no conjugation Listener understands only because of past experience No attempt or repeats cue 5

Vocabulary
Very good; wide range Uses appropriate and new words and expressions Interesting response Good, appropriate vocabulary Generally good response Vocabulary is just adequate to respond No attempt to vary expressions Basic Inadequate vocabulary or incorrect use of lexical items Communication difficult Does not complete responses Responses one or two words in length Vocabulary repeated No attempt Totally irrelevant answer

4 3

3 2

2

1

1

0

0

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Informal Speaking Rubric
Dimension The student: 4
Eagerly initiates speech, utilizing appropriate attentiongetting devices. Easily asks questions and speaks spontaneously. Almost always responds appropriately to questions/statements. Clarifies and continues conversation, using all or some of the following strategies: • circumlocution • survival strategies • intonation • self-correction • verbal cues • Incorporates a variety of old and new vocabulary. • Uses idiomatic expressions appropriate to topic. • Speaks clearly and imitates accurate pronunciation. Makes few errors in the following areas: • verbs in utterances when necessary with appropriate subject-verb agreement • noun and adjective...
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