Literature Review of Hospitality Industry

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Vol. 1, No. 1. ISSN: 1473-8376 www.hlst.ltsn.ac.uk/johlste

Finding the Hospitality Industry
Paul Slattery (paul.slattery@drkw.com) Dresdner Kleinwort Wasserstein 20 Fenchurch Street, London, UK. DOI:10.3794/johlste.11.7  Journal of Hospitality, Leisure, Sport and Tourism Education

Abstract
Some academics from the UK have published a conception of hospitality, which they argue is the basis for the understanding of the hospitality industry and for teaching and research in hospitality management (Brotherton, 1999; Lashley, 2000; Lashley and Morrison (eds.), 2000). This paper is in two parts. First, I will review the fundamental ideas proposed in these publications to illustrate that they degrade the hospitality industry. In the second part, I will introduce necessary contexts of the hospitality business, which they ignore and which render their approach redundant both for understanding the industry and as an effective basis for teaching and research in hospitality management. Keywords: three-domain approach, hospitality, industry, context

Part I: In search of hospitality
Conrad Lashley and Alison Morrison, (Lashley and Morrison (eds.), 2000), start from the view that the understanding of hospitality has been impaired by an industrial myopia. They propose to improve the understanding by; “reflecting insights into the study of hospitality that encompass the commercial provision of hospitality and the hospitality industry, yet at the same time recognise that hospitality needs to be explored in a private domestic setting and studies hospitality as a social phenomenon involving relationships between people.” (Lashley and Morrison (eds.), 2000:xvi) There are six chapters and Lashley’s introduction in which the gist of the social and private domains of hospitality is established. They are: An Anthropology of Hospitality, by Tom Selwyn; The Philosophy of Hospitableness, by Elizabeth Telfer; The Hospitality Trades: a Social History, by John K. Walton; Putting Up? Gender Hospitality and Performance, by Jane Darke and Craig Gurney; Home and Commercialised Hospitality, by Paul Lynch and Doreen MacWhannell; and Mediated Meanings of Hospitality: Television Personality Food Programmes, by Sandie Randall. Of these nine academics only Lashley, Lynch and Randall are employed to teach hospitality management. The editors mention

Paul Slattery advises hospitality companies on merger, acquisition and strategic activities. He recently advised Compass Group on the disposal of the Forte Hotel Group, the largest ever hotel chain auction. He speaks regularly at international hospitality investment and strategy conferences and writes on hospitality industry issues. He is a graduate in hotel and catering management, has a research degree on The Hotel as an Organisation and is Visiting Professor in Hospitality Management at Oxford Brookes University.

Slattery, P. (2002) Finding the Hospitality Industry that some chapters were commissioned and others were volunteered without revealing which were which, and they provide no rationale for the inclusion of these particular chapters in the collection.

The social domain
According to Lashley, the inclusion of the social domain enables the understanding of; “social settings in which acts of hospitality and acts of hospitableness take place together with the impacts of social forces on the production and consumption of food/drink/and accommodation”. (Lashley and Morrison (eds.), 2000:5) Additionally, the social domain will rekindle the notion that in ancient, subsistence cultures, ‘beliefs about hospitality and obligations to others were located in views and visions about the nature of society and the natural order of things’ (Lashley and Morrison (eds.), 2000:6). Selwyn says that; “The basic function of hospitality is to establish a relationship or to promote exchange of goods and services, both material and symbolic, between those who give hospitality (hosts) and those who receive it...
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