Literature - Jane Martins "Rodeo"

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  • Topic: Money, Rodeo
  • Pages : 2 (839 words )
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  • Published : August 1, 2005
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In the opening scene of Jane Martin's "Rodeo," there are many stereotypical props used to portray the beer-drinking, hard-working, cowboy image with the characteristic country music playing as an added touch. Most people are familiar with this type of scene in their minds, with a man as the character, but not this time – we find a tough, smart, opinionated woman with a distinctively country name of Lurlene, and the typical cowboy kind of nickname, Big Eight. The reader will dive deeper into the true character of this unusual woman and realize that she is no different from the average woman in today's workforce. She is feeling the frustration of discrimination and the push out of the only lifestyle that she knows, by "Them" (1667).

Over the last several years, it has become undeniable that any kind of sport can, and will, be sensationalized and commercialized by the people from the great companies like "Coca-Cola, Pepsi Cola, and Marlboro" (1667). These companies have hundreds of thousands of dollars budgeted each year to pour into sports in the form of sponsorships, advertising, etc. Once the sponsorships are introduced into a sport, it is exactly the kind of thing that will push an athlete out of competition. An athlete will find himself in a "make-it or break-it" situation. If an athlete receives a sponsorship, then the money is free flowing for equipment, testing, training, etc – anything that the athlete wants or needs to aid in putting himself in a winning position so that the sponsoring company can recoup its investment. Without sponsorship, it is a near hopeless situation for the athlete. The more a sport becomes commercialized, the higher the cost of participating for the athlete. One example would be that there are entry fees established to help raise monies that will be awarded to the winner and the sponsoring company. Unfortunately, for the athlete, once "they" start investing money into the sport, "they" also begin to place constraints...
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