Literary Review Reading Habits of Executives

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Marketing Management – I
Literature Review for the topic “Reading Habits of Executives” Term-1

Section : F

Ayush Kumar
Anshika Maheshwari
Sarveshwar Inani
Vedprakash Meshram
Utkarsh Gupta
Yogesh Meena

Indian Institute of Management, Lucknow

Executive Summary
In today’s Information based world, information plays critical role. And access to information helps in corporate education development as well as individual development. Information is requisite – it acts as connecting link between unawareness and knowledge. One of the major channels to get information is reading. It helps any executive or person to improve language skills. The reading of books and reading of newspaper are two different things. Executives love to read different material and material read include the reading of newspapers, the reading of the popular of magazines and of fiction. Reading interest depends upon many things – age, sex, education. Age differences were found in the pattern of reading time allocation that engendered high levels of recall. Specifically, younger adults who achieved high recall were more responsive to word frequency and the introduction of new concepts. By contrast, high recall among the old was related to a greater degree of on-line contextual facilitation (i.e., a steeper serial position effect). It is scientifically proved that capacity of working memory decreases as age increases. Much data provide indirect evidence for such a hypothesis, including age-related difficulties in making anaphoric inferences, age sensitivity to complex syntax, increased vulnerability in old age to the effects of fast speech, and the fact that age differences in independent estimates of working memory capacity can to some extent account for age differences in text recall. In fact, readers may be more likely to allocate resources when the text is more comprehensible and, hence, less difficult, as measured by recall; for example, Britton, Graesser, Glynn, Hamilton, and Penland (1983) demonstrated that young readers responded more slowly on a secondary task when reading narrative texts than expository texts. By this definition, a text may engage the resources of a reader for obligatory processes such as word analysis and meaning access, as well as for optional processes such as causal elaboration. -------------------------------------------------

If we consider the difference between reading novels and textbooks (including self help books) on the one hand and magazines and newspapers on the other, asymmetry between this becomes rather interesting. Whereas the typical manner of reading magazines and newspapers involves a large degree of skimming before settling down into a comfortable article (and it is not unusual for a whole newspaper or magazine article to be “read” without an entire piece ever being completed), textbooks and novels require an immediate and consistent cognitive commitment. -------------------------------------------------

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Table of Contents
1) Growth curves obtained from an objective study of reading habits. -Guy T. Buswell…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 4 2) Reading habits and attitudes of adults at different levels of education and occupation. -M. Cecil Smith…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 5 3) Families, motivation, and reading: Pre-adolescent students and their reading motivation and family reading habits. - Jill L. Janes………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 6 4) Reading interests and habits of older adults

- Sondra L.Rebottini……………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 7 5) PW/BEA survey finds some good news about reading habits - Jim Milliot………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 8 6) The development of reading and study habits in college students. - R.W.Deal………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 9 7) Reading Habits and Performance...
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