Literary Anaylisis John Donne

Only available on StudyMode
  • Topic: Poetry, Sonnet, Thomas Egerton, 1st Viscount Brackley
  • Pages : 4 (1532 words )
  • Download(s) : 245
  • Published : March 23, 2013
Open Document
Text Preview
Terra Goodfellow
Mrs. Ashmore
English Dual Credit IV
14 November 2012
Literary Analysis of “Sweetest Love” by John Donne
John Donne was believed to be one of the greatest poets and preachers of the 1600’s. He was very witty and educated, but also very emotional. These characteristics are very predominant in his writing (Stringer 1). This phenomenal poet, John Donne was born in the earlier part of 1572 in London. His parents were both very devout Roman Catholics, though he barely knew his father because he passed just before Donne turned four years old. Donne’s mother was from a good family and when she was involved in the Church she and her family “endured much for the Roman Catholic doctrine” (Kermode 2). In 1593, John Donne’s brother passed away, and made Donne start to question his faith. John Donne eventually became an Anglican (Jokinen 1). While staying at the Lincoln Inn, John Donne had become friends with Christopher Brooke and in 1596 joined him on a naval expedition to Spain. He went on another expedition to the Azores in 1597. During his expedition to Azores he wrote “The Calm” (Jokinen 1). In 1598 John Donne was hired to be the secretary for Sir Thomas Egerton, who, at the time, was a very predominant government official. In 1601 John Donne secretly married Sir Thomas Egerton’s niece, Ann More. When Ann More’s father found out he was furious. John Donne had tried to apologize and even wrote him a letter, but that wasn’t enough and he had John Donne fired and eventually imprisoned (Jokinen 1). Donne had trouble supporting himself and his family for the next fourteen years. In 1615, however, John Donne became an Anglican priest. During this time, John Donne went on to receive a Doctor of Divinity degree from Cambridge University (Stringer 1). In 1616, John Donne “was appointed reader in divinity at Lincoln’s Inn, where, over the years, he both gave and received satisfaction” (Kermode 2). After his wife’s death in 1617, John Donne celebrated her...
tracking img