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Literacy narrative essay

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Literacy narrative essay

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  • November 2013
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Literacy Narrative Essay
Code switching is switching the way you are talking depending on who you are talking with. The three ways of code switching are: language, register (high register or low register) and dialect, which is accent and word choice. For example, you speak differently with your teacher than how you speak with your friend, like “Hey, whtss up?” to your friend, while “Hello, how are you doing today?” You speak in more formal way and with more respect with teachers and parents than your friends.

Hindi is like my mother tongue as I am from India and English is what I speak with my teachers and friends in school, or strangers outside of my house. I speak Hindi with my parents, my granny, my uncle, pretty much everyone in my family speak in Hindi with each other except my cousins. For example, if I want to say “Hello, how are you?” to my parents or any of my family member I’ll say “Hello, aap kaise ho?” and if I want to say the same thing to my friends I’ll say “Hey, whtss up?” I hear English more, but at home I hear all people around me speaking in Hindi. When I say something in English sometimes my dad’s like “What?” but with my sister it’s perfectly fine. Sometimes accidently I mix 2 languages- Hindi and English. For example, once I asked my sister,” Hey girl, how are you? Kya kar rahi ho?” means “Hey girl, how are you? What are you doing?” My sister speak more like in American accent as she is in 4th grade and her English is better than mine and she speaks faster than me. When I speak in English with my friends, more friends of mine are Indian or their parents are from India and they can understand me and even though when I don’t know how to put something in words, they can understand what I am trying to say. But with my other friends who are not Indians I can understand them very well, but then again when I speak sometimes they can’t understand perfectly what I am trying to say. Even though I and my sister speak in English many times, it’s...