Listening to Loud Music

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  • Topic: Heart, Blood, Circulatory System
  • Pages : 2 (780 words )
  • Download(s) : 168
  • Published : October 11, 2012
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A new study shows that listening to loud music also causes our hearts to beat faster and our blood pressure to rise as well whereas, listening to slower, softer music actually lowers blood pressure and decreases our heart rates. Italian researchers at Pavia University seem to enjoy conducting researching on how music affects human beings. One the first studies that the concluded was on how music with quicker tempos effected a person’s breathing may causing them to breath faster, with an increase in their heart rate and blood pressure, whilst music that had a slower tempo produced the opposite effect. Their latest findings prove how music affects a person’s cardiovascular system. In a statement by Dr. Luciano Bernardi, a professor of internal medicine at Pavia University, and author of the study, said that the findings “increase our understanding of how music could be used in rehabilitative medicine.” Dr. Michael Miller, director of the Center for Preventive Cardiology at the University of Maryland Medical Center, has already done his own research on assessing the cardiovascular effects of music and is placing that knowledge to good medical use. Miller was quoted as saying: “The take-home message from this paper is now being employed at many hospitals, including ours. In the cardiovascular unit, we play music that is very soothing and quiet. On a subconscious level, it produces a decrease in blood pressure and heart rate.” However there are a few subtle differences between Dr Miller’s research and Dr Bernardi’s research. The study conducted by Pavia University played only classical music, with a mixture of Beethoven’s Ninth Symphony, a Bach cantata, and arias from operas by Puccini and Verdi. The two dozen volunteers who were measured for the musical effects on their cardiovascular systems were in their mid-20s who listened to the music via headphones. It is interesting to note that half of the numbers of volunteers were also trained singers. Electrocardiograms...
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