Lip Plates and Stick Fights: Structuring the Suri Society

Only available on StudyMode
  • Topic: Lip plate, Mursi, Surma people
  • Pages : 2 (2650 words )
  • Download(s) : 656
  • Published : November 16, 2010
Open Document
Text Preview

 
 
 
 
 
 “Lip
Plates
and
Stick
Fights:
Structuring
the
Suri
Society”
 Hillary
Hubert
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 Indigenous
Religions:
Sub‐Saharan
Africa
 Professor
Adogame
 November
15,
2010

Hillary
Hubert
 1
 Lip
Plates
and
Stick
Fights:
Structuring
the
Suri
Society
 Rituals
and
beliefs
are
often
thought
of
as
complete
opposites.
While
rituals
 focus
on
what
a
person
is
doing,
the
latter
depends
on
a
person’s
thinking.
However,
 it
is
commonly
underestimated
how
innately
linked
these
two
concepts
are.
Rituals
 can
be
viewed
as
a
way
of
teaching
beliefs,
and
beliefs
give
the
guidelines
for
rituals.
 The
dynamic
relationship
between
both
are
overwhelming
and
interesting.
 Questions
can
be
posed
such
as:
should
not
beliefs
be
embodied
in
the
person
both
 internally
and
externally,
and
does
each
culture
abhor
change
in
order
to
minimize
 the
affects
on
their
beliefs?
One
thing
is
certain
within
the
indigenous
African
 religions;
the
religious
cultures
share
and
communicate
ideas
to
create
a
unique
and
 communal
experience.

 In
the
plains
of
southwestern
Ethiopia,
the
Suri
tribe
has
flourished
for
the
 past
two
hundred
years.1
Their
homeland
is
remote,
which
has
forced
them
to
 become
a
highly
self‐sufficient
society.
The
tribe
worships
a
sky
deity,
Tuma,
and
 also
uses
medicine
men
to
communicate
with
spirits
and
send
their
messages
to
the
 deity.
One
male
in
the
tribe
is
chosen
through
a
hereditary
line
to
hold
the
vital
 position
of
the
rainmaker,
a
man
who
carries
ambivalent
powers
to
control
the
 weather.2
The
men
of
the
villages
are
divided
into
four
groups
according
to
age:
 children,
young
men
(tegay),
junior
elders
(rora),
and
senior
elders
(bora).
All
of
the
 particular
groups
have
certain
duties
that
they
must
perform
in
order
for
the
society
 to
function.
Ceremonies
that
are
held
to
facilitate
the
men
in
the
tribe
from
one
stage
 to
the
next
are
held
once
every
twenty
or
thirty
years
and
include
extreme
violence.3
...
tracking img