Lion and Asiatic Lions

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  • Topic: Lion, Africa, Inbreeding
  • Pages : 3 (1026 words )
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  • Published : April 8, 2012
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ESAU GARCIA 
WHAT HAPPENED TO THE LIONS?????
BIOLOGY 
March 5 2012

Mrs Loughney

INTRO
Extinction is a problem that has been around since the beginning of time. An organism might go extinct for many reasons. Some reasons might be Mother Nature. Man also plays a part as they might over hunt the organism and drive it to extinct. But another cause is natural selection and the belief that only the strong will survive in this game we call life. Many problems can happen because of extinction it could offsets the ecosystem they are living in. Case in point if a certain predator goes extinct that would permit its prey to reproduce and offset the ecosystem in that area. Extinction is in the wrong when it does not come about through natural selection and as an alternative it happens through hunting an animal extensively for its fur or tusks. There are certain ways extinction can happens and hunting should not be one of the ways it happens natural selection should decide which animals get extinct and not us humans. One of these organisms facing extinction is the lions located in Africa. One of the reasons there at risk of becoming in danger, is because hunters hunt them for their beautiful .Throughout this report I will inform you of the condition of the lions. I will talk about how we can prevent them from going extinct and preserve this creature.

Lions are a creature mainly to be found in Africa. Like most creatures there are many types of lions. There are 12 recognized subspecies of the lions determined by size, mane, and distribution. However the most in danger is the Asiatic Lion as there are less than 400 left. So this report will be focusing on these specific lion.

The lion got its name from the Latin leo; and the Ancient Greek λέων (leon). The Hebrew word לָבִיא (lavi) may also be related. It was one of the many species originally described by Linnaeus, who gave it the name Felis leo, in his eighteenth century work, Systema Naturae. The...
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