Lines Composed a Few Miles Above Tintern Abbey on Romanticism

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Lines Composed a Few Miles Above Tintern Abbey is a poem by William Wordsworth that has a strong, central theme of romanticism. Wordsworth was the pioneer poet in the field of literary philosophy which is now called romanticism. This poem reflects a romantic theme in two main ways. First is that throughout the passage of the entirety of the poem, there is a stressed view point upon imagination and remembrance, and most notably lots of emotion involved in the poem. The second way this poem has a romantic theme is that the poet, Wordsworth, describes/exhibits his love of nature through his many revelations and remembering of memories. Continued, this poem shows lots of imagination and therefore romanticism by the way Wordsworth stresses memories. In the beginning of the poem he remembers the abbey from five years ago and he is reliving the memories. Then he describes how he perceives and longs for the same degree of nature in those five years since he has returned. Later in the poem, the author rejoices in the fact that he can fuel his imagination with new memories of this trip. In terms of the application of emotion, and therefore romanticism, Wordsworth uses many personal adjectives to describe nature around him. Rather than dote upon the size of the mountains and the age rings and the disrepair of the abbey, he takes an alternative viewpoint and uses emotions to show his joy for these things. The author is happy and it shows in the poem, this shows the romantic theme. The romantic theme of the poem also applies in a more simplistic manner in the way that the author longs for and enjoys everything about nature around him. As was noted in the previous sentence, the surrounding area makes him happy. In the poem Wordsworth says, he still loves nature, still loves mountains and pastures and woods, for they anchor his purest thoughts and guard the heart and soul of his "moral being."
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