Life Is What You Make It: Why Romeo and Juliet Were Doomed from the Start

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Emily Kauzlarich
Life is what you Make it: Why Romeo and Juliet were Doomed from the Start In the play, Romeo and Juliet, the Friar has a particularly important part. He not only marries Romeo and Juliet but he also is the instigator for both of their deaths. Towards the end of the play he gives a rather long speech basically summing up the play in a nutshell. For such a small role in the play, the Friar is responsible for much of the tragedy that occurs. The speech that the Friar gives near the beginning of the play when he is speaking to, and about his plants, foreshadows the love, hate and death throughout the play.

The flowers and plants that the Friar is so passionate about also play a small role with much impact. Not only does the Friar use them to make a sleeping potion for Juliet but it foreshadows the death of Romeo with the poison that he drinks to kill himself. The speech suggests that a plant, or flower, can be either good or bad, depending on which way that plant or flower used (2.3.5-20). This directly relates to humans and how they can also use themselves as bad or good. It is the will of the human of whether or not they are going to act graciously or monstrously. This speech given by the Friar has the audacity to give the idea that love in the play can possibly conquer the evil (2.3.5-20). For such a thing as love conquering the evil, the evil has to be conquerable. Two families that hate each other enough to kill one another in the streets over something incredibly minute cannot be conquered by love. It also tells the reader that it can be the other way around and evil can conquer love. This is much more realistic for the situation that Romeo and Juliet are in and it is true for the story. The Friar agrees to marry Romeo and Juliet because he wants to overcome the evil that is going on between the Montegues and the Capulets, not because he believes that they actually love each other and are meant to be. It is naïve for the Friar to think that...
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