Life in Japanese Internment Camp

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The Unimaginable: The life in Japanese Americans Internment Camps

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OUTLINE
Introduction
Thesis: Even though the Japanese Americans were able to adapt to their new environment, the Japanese American internment camps robbed the evacuees of their basic rights. Background
I.Japanese Americans adapted to their new environment by forming communities at the camps.
A. One of the first actions that evacuees took is establishing school system. B. The evacuees established self-government among themselves. C. The evacuees produced own food and other products for themselves. II.The evacuees adapted to their new environment by creating means of joy and happiness.

A. The internees played games and sports.
B. The internees made use of arts and music to create joy. C. The internees, especially women, enjoyed the freedom from having to do housework.
D. The internees continued with what they did outside the barbed wire. III.The internees had no privacy and were always reminded of the fact that they are being controlled and supervised.
A. Everywhere, they are surrounded by factors that force them to acknowledge the fact that they are being interned such as barbed wire and soldiers. B. The lack of privacy can be shown during meal time.

C. The structure of the camps are meant to give the internees no private time.

IV.The internees lost relationship with people around them.
A. The internees lost relationship with their families.
B. The internees lost relationship with their village people. .
C. The internment forced the internees to lose the traditional relationship between Issei and Nisei.
Conclusion

The Unimaginable: The Life in Japanese American Internment Camp

World War II was a time of mass hatred and unnecessary sufferings of innocents. This belief is, in most part, based off of the establishment of Jewish concentration camp for the Holocaust. However, that is not the whole picture. Japanese Americans in the United States of America were forcefully moved to concentration camps, what they called relocation camps, and lost all their possessions just because they looked like the citizens of Japan who attacked the U.S. in December 7th, 1941. These Japanese Americans, men, women, and babies, had to suffer the consequences of the action taken by the people on the other side of the world just because of their appearance and ethnicity. During the internment, even though the Japanese Americans were able to adapt to their new environment, the Japanese American internment camps robbed the evacuees of their basic rights. The evacuees adapted to their new environment by establishing communities and creating joy within the harsh conditions. Despite so, the camps took away the internees’ rights to have privacy and forced them to lose relationship with people they love and care.

Since the 1880s, the Japanese came to United States of America for sugar and pineapple crops in Hawaii (Fremon 12). By 1900, there were almost 25,000 Japanese Americans, including Issei, first generation, and Nisei, Issei’s children, in the Pacific Coast (12). However, more and more anti-Japanese groups including the Japanese Laundry League formed as Japanese succeeded in their American lives (13). Starting from there, the Japanese Americans had to face discrimination from every corner of their lives. In 1906, San Francisco removed Japanese students from white school and made them attend the segregated school in Chinatown (13). This problem was resolved by the Gentlemen’s agreement between America and Japan in which Japan agreed to stop Japanese immigration and American agreed to stop the segregated school system (14). Facing discrimination, the Issei and Nisei still did well; only 1600 Issei owned farms, but they produced almost 30%-35% of all fruits or vegetables in California (18). They united with each other and helped each other live in the U.S.A. Continuing with the discrimination from...
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