Libertarian Party

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  • Topic: Bob Barr, Libertarianism, United States
  • Pages : 8 (2581 words )
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  • Published : April 16, 2009
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Works Cited ………………………………………………………………………….13


The Libertarian Party’s belief for government is “less government” according to the presidential candidate Bob Barr’s campaign’s website. This paper shall discus the history of the Libertarian Party, its platform, and the presidential candidate Bob Barr. The Libertarian party began in the 1970s and continues to grow even up to today. David Nolan in Denver, Colorado founded the Libertarian party. In the 1980s began to get further recognition with the help of several prominent individuals. But its growth didn’t stop there; more and more politicians began to run for office under the Libertarian party ballot. Their belief is very simple in most parts “The answer is less government” (Bob Barr 2008). The Libertarian party’s beliefs for the ideal government is broken down and categorized in three different liberties: personal freedom, economic freedom, and security. In the recent presidential campaign, Libertarian Bob Barr decided run against Democratic Barak Obama and Republican John Mccain. Because of being unable to acquire enough amounts of votes he was not elected into the Presidency. Barr had not always been a Libertarian, there were something’s that led him to leave his party and reside with another. Being a new third party the Libertarians have proven with their history and votes along their beliefs that they have a lot to Americans pertaining to individual rights


This chapter shall be broken down into three parts: the beginning 1970s, the middle 1980-1990s, and the current era of the new millennium starting with the year 2000.
David Nolan founded the Libertarian party in Denver, CO. According to the Libertarian party’s website “Disillusioned Republicans, Democrats and political newcomers hope to create an alternative to the old parties.” After the Libertarian Party was formed in 1971 John Hospers was nominated for Presidential Candidacy in 1972. Hospers received 3,673 votes to which the ballots were only in Colorado and Washington. (United States 190). He received a measure of national attention when Republican presidential elector from Virginia, Roger Macbride, cast his electoral vote for the Libertarian presidential nominee (United States 190). His action made him famous among the Libertarians and the party chose him to be the 1976 standard-bearer in its August convention in New York City. In 1976 he ran for president and got on the ballot of thirty- two states. Macbride’s strength had centered mostly in the West with 5.5 percent or more in Alaska, and 1 percent in Arizona, Hawaii, and Idaho. He also ran well ahead of his national average in California (0.7 percent) and Nevada (0.8 percent). His running mate was David Bergland, a California lawyer and future presidential candidate (United States 190). In the state of Alaska Dick Randolph was the Libertarian to be elected as a state legislator in the year 1978 (Libertarian Party).

The Libertarian Party appeared on the ballot in all fifty states and the District of Columbia for the first time in 1980. The party also fielded about 550 candidates for other offices a number that dwarfed other third party efforts. (United States 190) Edward E. Clark of California was nominated for president and David Koch was his running mate. E. E. Clark garnered 921,299 votes or 1.1 percent of the nation’s votes. It was the highest vote total obtained by the Libertarian national ticket to date (United States 190). His campaign ran extensive national television ads and offered many Americans their first look at what the Libertarian party had to offer. Many in the media recognized the Libertarian party for the first time as a serious political force...
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