Letter to Birmingham Jail

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Letter from Birmingham Jail

In Martin Luther King Jr.’s "Letter from Birmingham Jail," He’s responding to a statement made by clergymen in Alabama about his dealings in Birmingham, Alabama. In this letter King uses rational ideas, moral values, and emotion to establish to the clergymen as well as the "white moderate" why civil rights should be granted to African Americans. In his letter King uses powerful literary tools that strongly match his views. He uses similes to help the audience understand not only the historical foundation of why segregation is immoral, but the awful emotional effects that segregation and discrimination has on the African American people who are experiencing it. King uses realistic imagery to give the reader an idea about how segregation harms a person’s character. Martin Luther King Jr.'s "Letter from Birmingham Jail" had a great effect on the audiences because of his skilled use of pathos throughout the essay.

King invokes anger, sympathy, and compassion to stress his views that racism has seized the civil rights movement and for that purpose, he is in Birmingham City Jail. King uses common sense, moral principles, and emotions all throughout his letter, his use of logic and emotions with the aid of imagery, shows his viewpoint to the world. As he is revealing in this piece, King's ability for articulating his ideas in his writing has caused him to be considered one of America's greatest speakers.

The imagery that King used in his letter gave the audience an illustration of how segregation has affected African Americans. King uses detailed illustrations, such as a daughter who finds out that she can't visit an amusement park because it is closed to colored children. King makes use of the just the right quantity of pathos to reach out to the audience and made sure that the civil rights movement and the African-Americans are justified in their causes.

King used his letter as a tool to...
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