Lets March !

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On August 28, 1963, The March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom was held in Washington D.C. More than 250,000 demonstrators participated in the event, which was considered the largest public protest in American history. Speakers at the event included Martin Luther King Jr. of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC); Congressman John Lewis (then a college student and member of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee); Whitney Young of the Urban League; Roy Wilkins, executive secretary of the NAACP; and various religious and civic organizations. The March on Washington is credited with helping to pass the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and Voting Rights Act of 1965. In the very early 1960's, civil rights leader had discussions to have a large protest that would fight and protect against discrimination. They hoped such a demonstration would bring the need for civil rights for all Americans to the forefront of the nation, that would place pressure on lawmakers to change discriminatory laws.

•Ella Baker was a charismatic labor organizer and longtime leader in the Southern Christian Leadership Conference. She believed the movement should not place too much emphasis on leaders. •Septima Poinsette Clark, often called the “queen mother” of civil rights, was an educator and National Association for the Advancement of Colored People activist decades before the nation’s attention turned to racial equality. •Fannie Lou Hamer, a Mississippi sharecropper, was beaten and jailed in 1962 for trying to register to vote. She co-founded the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party and gave a fiery speech at the 1964 Democratic National Convention. •Vivian Malone Jones defied segregationist Alabama Gov. George C. Wallace to enroll in the University of Alabama in 1963 and later worked in the civil rights division of the U.S. Justice Department. In 1955, Parks refused to give up her bus seat to a white man in Montgomery, Ala., sparking a mass boycott by thousands, mainly...
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