Lethal Injection

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Lethal Injection: Retribution for Families
One of the most intense and detailed analyses proved that slightly more than four in 10 offenders return to prison within three years. Nearly half of every single criminal that has ever gone to jail has returned to jail for a second time. That means that the current correctional officers and our jailing system are failing to implant into the minds of criminals that what they are doing is not acceptable in society. These men were placed in jail for committing crimes such as armed robbery, burglary, assault, rape, aggravated assault, attempted murder, and murder. Should attempted murderers be allowed to return to the streets to finish their job? Should convicted murderers not face the same consequences as their victims? Capital Punishment through lethal injection is the most efficient and least painful method of ending a criminal’s life. There are no other cost efficient and humane alternatives to the severest type of punishment dealt by the judicial branch of our government. Lethal Injection is a necessity to society because it provides motivation or demotivation so to speak for those who consider breaking laws or even harming other human beings. Lethal Injections should be legalized and accepted in all fifty states because it provides retribution for the loved ones of victims, it is the most efficient and pain-free form of the death penalty and it is entirely constitutional. Capital punishment is controversial because of the constitutionality and the inability to correct any errors, but the positives lambaste the negatives. Some people bring up the argument that some people are wrongly convicted of crimes they did not commit. These people would be sentenced to death and killed as innocent people. Every form of punishment has certain flaws or objections. The only problem is that with capital punishment there is no way of correcting any mistakes that are made by jurors or judges. Any mistakes in this process do not only inconvenience someone; it costs that person their life. They don’t face the consequences of a jury's mistake, but the victim's family and friends have to live with someone else's mistake for the rest of their lives. Another more pressing argument for their case is that despite the evolution in the manner convicted criminal offenders are being executed and the use of modern medical methods of execution, there are still those who oppose lethal injection and argue that it can cause unnecessary pain and suffering. Specifically, lawyers for the accused in Kentucky challenged the use of three-drug combination arguing that lethal injections violate the Eighth Amendment prohibition against cruel and unusual punishment. The opponents of lethal injection who are anesthesiologists and end-of-life doctors argue that if a person is not properly anesthetized the paralyzing drug which is the second drug injected will prevent the inmate from being able to indicate any pain or distress. The third drug will make matters worse for the inmate as he will only feel as if he is slowly being suffocated. This experience will be excruciatingly painful for him and he will most likely feel burning sensation in his veins (Bronner). Clarence Ray Allen was the last man to be put to death in California before a moratorium on executions in the state was issued in 2006. His first murder conviction came in 1977 for arranging the 1974 killing of a potential witness against him in a burglary. Allen was sentenced to life in prison. Then, in 1980, while behind bars, Allen arranged the killings of witnesses who had testified against him in his murder trial. He was finally sentenced to death, but even then it wasn't until 26 years after the killing that he was finally executed. During all that time, the loved ones of the deceased had no closure. Retribution is not only a need of society; it is a right of those victimized (Ardaiz). Another just as severe case where the death penalty should have been...
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