Legion of Honor

Only available on StudyMode
  • Download(s) : 923
  • Published : May 6, 2013
Open Document
Text Preview
Throughout different time periods and civilizations come many different types of art that would never be comparable to those of another time or place. There are also the pieces that come from a completely different time and place, but yet they can still be compared to one another. The Torso of a God (Egyptian, New Kingdom, Dynasty 18, last decade of the reign of Amenhotep III, Granodiorite, 1359-1349 B.C.) and the Statue of Asklepios (Greek, Hellenistic period, Pentelic Marble, 2nd century B.C.) are two sculptures made hundreds of years apart, yet they both display many similarities and show how art is constantly changing whilst keeping the same core ideas.

The Torso of a God is a sculpture located at the Legion of Honor museum in San Francisco. The sculpture is of a pharaoh holding a staff in front of its chest with his left hand. In his right hand he is holding something that could possibly be a bell or a key, by his side. The piece looks as though it never had legs past the knees due to the stability that exists and the fact that it appears to be flat on the area it sits on. The head has broken off so that only the headpiece and beard can be seen and it is broken at an angle that the right shoulder is missing as well. The left arm is also missing except for the hand and shoulder. The back of the piece is flat as though the piece was originally located against a wall. This piece is about three feet tall and about two feet wide. The piece is smooth all over and even though certain areas are carved out, the piece still has a smooth glossy look. The statue is wearing some sort of skirt that covers the area from the hips all the way down to the bottom of the piece. It also looks like the God is wearing a bracelet on his right wrist as well as a necklace underneath the beard and headpiece. The skirt and headpiece are shown by many vertical lines next to one another with a border around them to show where they stop. Other than the left leg that is slightly...
tracking img