Learnings from Ncmh and Process Recording

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What did I learned in NCMH duty in 1 week RLE?
Anxious yet thrilled. That describes exactly how we felt as we entered the gate of NCMH. We were all nervous because we will never know how a mentally ill person will suddenly behave and might be very unpredictable. But later on as we’ve finally meet and get to know them, our fears turned into excitement as we anticipate meeting them again the next day. The thing that only worried me was that I would probably run out of questions and topics to ask from a timid and reserved patient.

Our clinical instructor was right when he said that having a duty in NCMH for only just 1 week is not that satisfying since we cant maximize our time to do all the planned activities with the patients, since usually it should be done within 2 weeks. But even though it had been like that, we’ve had a good start on our first day though we only have few backgrounds about the area. After that “Self-awareness test”, I’ve come to known myself better and even learned to control my emotions. I learned to trust my group-mates and even understand them in a different perspective. I was able to learn how to use proper therapeutic techniques though I’m not that good at talking. My psychiatric lessons in school became more interesting and more comprehensible than how I’ve imagined it before especially about the drugs used for disturbed patients. The experienced of witnessing how ECT was done would have been better if they’d allowed us to assist them in the procedure. We even observed bipolar and distinguished types of Schizophrenia among our own patients. There are lots of interesting things about this field that makes it different when you’re in the hospital ward or special areas. It really fascinates me to observed the unusual behaviours and thinking of the patients and how they slowly returned to reality. Above all, I’ve learned how to restrain myself from asking my patient “why?”

I realized that it was just a...
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