Learning Theory Chart

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Individual Graphic Organizer

Nelson Ortiz Guzman

University of Phoenix

Comparison of Learning Theories

Learning is defined by The American Heritage College Dictionary as, “the act, process, or experience of gaining knowledge or skill” (p. 772). The process of learning focus on what happens when learning is taking place. Learning theories were developed to address how individuals learn, explain what happens when learning takes place, and why learning occurs.

Learning theories have been around for a long period. Three common learning theories will be discussed following this introduction. The three learning theories that will be discussed are the behavioral learning theory, the constructivist learning theory, and the cognitive learning theory. Behavioral learning theory has three components that Gredler (2009) describes as, “(a) the occasion on which the behavior occurs, (b) the behavior itself, and (c) the consequence of the behavior” (para 25). Cognitive strategies, “places mental activity at the focus of interest” (Martinez, 2010, para 5). Finally, the constructivist learning theory describes learning as a constructive process.

Learning Theories Chart

|Behaviorist Learning |Constructivist Learning |Cognitive Learning | |*Learning is a relatively enduring change in |*The influence of constructivism in teaching|*The impact of cognitive learning theories on | |observable behavior that occurs because of |and learning has increased over the last |education has grown within the last 40 years. | |experience (Skinner, 1953). |several years. The shift toward |Cognitive learning theories are defined as | | |literature-based approaches to reading, for |“learning by focusing on changes in mental | |*Behaviorism does not consider any ideas, |example and...
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