Learning styles

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Learning styles

By | December 2012
Page 1 of 2
Learning Styles Essay

A learning style is defined as an individual’s unique approach to learning based on their strengths, weaknesses, and preferences. Some people learn best when being taught in a hands on manner, others are visual learners who have a preference for seen and observed things, while some learn best from the spoken word, and what is called auditory learning. In 1983, Harvard professor and researcher, Howard Gardner, introduced a theory called the Multiple Intelligence Theory that proposed that all people are born with seven “intelligences”, which account for how a person is able to learn and use information. This theory differed from the dominant definition of intelligence that was basically limited to mathematical and linguistic abilities, and proposed that rather than limiting the definition of intelligence to those two abilities, his group of seven types of intelligence more accurately accounts for the different ways people acquire and use knowledge. Over the years there have been different types of tests created to identify one’s learning style, in order to determine the way that each person is best able to obtain and use the information that is taught. Learning Style identification is a useful tool for educational professionals and students alike, but one theory in particular has been adopted by educators across the world. Howard Gardner identified seven types of “intelligences” that he believes every person possesses. Gardner defines intelligence as “the capacity to solve problems or to fashion products that are valued in one or more cultural setting” (Gardner & Hatch, 1989). The seven strengths outlined in the theory are: Linguistic, meaning words and language are used to communicate information, Logical-Mathematical, using numbers and logic, Musical, which isn’t necessarily musical ability but more so the awareness, appreciation and use of sounds, tones, and rhythm. Bodily-kinesthetic intelligence is strength in learning by physical...