Learning Style

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David  Kolb's  learning  styles  model  and  experien6al  learning  theory  (ELT) Having  developed
 the
 model
 over
 many
 years
 prior,
 David
 Kolb
 published
 his
 learning
 styles
 model
 in
 1984.
 The
 model
  gave
 rise
 to
 related
 terms
 such
 as
 Kolb's
 experienAal
 learning
 theory
 (ELT),
 and
 Kolb's
 learning
 styles
 inventory
 (LSI).
 In
  his
 publicaAons
 -­‐
 notably
 his
 1984
 book
 'ExperienAal
 Learning:
 Experience
 As
 The
 Source
 Of
 Learning
 And
  Development'
 Kolb
 acknowledges
 the
 early
 work
 on
 experienAal
 learning
 by
 others
 in
 the
 1900's,
 including
 Rogers,
  Jung,
 and
 Piaget.
 In
 turn,
 Kolb's
 learning
 styles
 model
 and
 experienAal
 learning
 theory
 are
 today
 acknowledged
 by
  academics,
 teachers,
 managers
 and
 trainers
 as
 truly
 seminal
 works;
 fundamental
 concepts
 towards
 our
 understanding
  and
 explaining
 human
 learning
 behaviour,
 and
 towards
 helping
 others
 to
 learn.
 See
 also
 Gardner's
 MulAple
  Intelligences
 and
 VAK
 learnings
 styles
 models,
 which
 assist
 in
 understanding
 and
 using
 Kolb's
 learning
 styles
 concepts. In
 addiAon
 to
 personal
 business
 interests
 (Kolb
 is
 founder
 and
 chairman
 of
 Experience
 Based
 Learning
 Systems),
 David
  Kolb
 is
 sAll
 (at
 the
 Ame
 I
 write
 this,
 2005)
 Professor
 of
 OrganizaAonal
 Development
 at
 Case
 Western
 Reserve
  University,
 Cleveland,
 Ohio,
 where
 he
 teaches
 and
 researches
 in
 the
 fields
 of
 learning
 and
 development,
 adult
  development,
 experienAal
 learning,
 learning
 style,
 and
 notably
 'learning
 focused
 insAtuAonal
 development
 in
 higher
  educaAon'. A  note  about  Learning  Styles  in  young  people's  educa6on Towards  the
 end
 of
 the
 first
 decade
 of
 the
 2000s
 a
 lobby
 seems
 to
 have
 grown
 among
 certain
 educaAonalists
 and
  educaAonal
 researchers,
 which
 is
 summarised
 very
 briefly
 as
 follows:
 that
 in
 terms
 of
 substanAal
 large-­‐scale
 scienAfic
  research
 into
 young
 people's
 educaAon,
 'Learning
 Styles'
 theories,
 models,
 instruments,
 etc.,
 remain
 largely
 unproven
  methodologies.
 Moreover
 Learning
 Styles
 objectors
 and
 opponents
 assert
 that
 heavy
 relience
 upon
 Learning
 Styles
  theory
 in
 developing
 and
 conducAng
 young
 people's
 educaAon,
 is
 of
 quesAonable
 benefit,
 and
 may
 in
 some
 cases
 be
  counter-­‐producAve.

Despite
 this,
 (and
 this
 is
 my
 personal
 view,
 not
 the
 view
 of
 the
 'anA-­‐Learning
 Styles
 lobby'),
 many
 teachers
 and
  educators
 conAnue
 to
 find
 value
 and
 benefit
 by
 using
 Learning
 Styles
 theory
 in
 one
 way
 or
 another,
 and
 as
 oben
  applies
 in
 such
 situaAons,
 there
 is
 likely
 to
 be
 usage
 which
 is
 appropriate,
 and
 other
 usage
 which
 is
 not. Accordingly
 -­‐
 especially
 if
 you
 are
 working
 with
 young
 people
 -­‐
 use
 systems
 and
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