Learning Experiences(to Kill a

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One of the principal aims of To Kill a Mockingbird is to subject the narrator to a series of learning experiences and then observe how much she profits from her experiences. There is rarely a chapter that does not teach Scout something new or does not build toward a new learning experience. So, one rewarding approach to the novel is throughout an examination of these experiences.

In the largest view, Scout learns about (1) justice and injustice through the Tom Robinson trial; (2) prejustice and its effects on the processes of the law and society; (3) courage as manifested in ways others act; and (4) respect for individuality of the human being. On a smaller scale, Scout learns numerous things about numerous people; she becomes aware of the difficulty of being a lady, particularly when under dressed; and she learns when to fight and not to fight.

Many of scouts learning experiences being in clearly insignificant scenes. Ultimately she must learn to respect the difference in behavior between vastly different people, especially when the behavior differs from the normal as radically as in the cases of Boo Radley, Mrs. Dubose, and the Cunninghams. So early in the novel, Scout in the novel, Scout is faced with some confusing experiences at school, where she confronts a teacher who dosen't understand why she can read and where she meets Walter Cunningham. Later, Atticus explains to her that to judge a person you must try to see things from that person's point of view. You must learn to walk aroun in his skin. Then you cab uderstand better why a person acts or belives what he does.

Only at the end of the novel does Scout finally learn to respect this saying. Until then, she remains curious and confused why Boo never came out of his house. In the meantime she goes through a series of maturing experiences. She learns how to see her from the teachers point of view; she tries to judge the Cunninghams and the Ewells from their...
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