Learner Guide for a Level Economics

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Learner Guide for Cambridge AS and A Level Economics

Learner Guide for Cambridge AS and A Level Economics
How to use this guide
The guide describes what you need to know about your Economics examination. It will help you to plan your revision programme and will explain what Cambridge International Examinations is looking for.

The guide contains the following sections:

Section 1: How will you be tested?
This section will give you information about the different examination papers you will take.

Section 2: Examination tips
This section gives you advice to help you do as well as you can. Some of the tips are general advice and some are based on the common mistakes that learners make in exams.

Section 3: What will be tested?
This section describes the five assessment objectives in Economics

Section 4: What you need to know
This shows the syllabus content so that you can check:
• which topics you need to know about
• details about each topic area in the syllabus
• how much of the syllabus you have covered

Section 5: Useful Websites

© Cambridge International Examinations 2012

Learner Guide for Cambridge AS and A Level Economics

Section 1: How will you be tested?
The table below gives you information about the examination papers you will take. Paper

Type

Duration

Number of
Questions

Maximum
Mark

1

Multiple
Choice
(Core)
(a)
Data
Response
(Core)
(b)
Structured
Essay (Core)

1 hour

30

30

Weight (%
of total
marks for
syllabus)
40

45 minutes
(recommended)

1

20

30

45 minutes
(recommended)

1 from a
choice of 3

20

30

2

2

© Cambridge International Examinations 2012

Learner Guide for Cambridge AS and A Level Economics

Section 2: Examination tips
General Advice
















It is very important that you look very closely at the ‘command’ or ‘directive’ words used in a question. These tell you what we are looking for. If a question asks you to ‘identify’, ‘state’ or ‘calculate’ something, you should not write a very long answer. If, however, the question asks you to ‘explain’ or ‘discuss’ something, this will require you to go into much more detail and your answer should be longer. Very often, with a ‘discuss’ question, you will be expected to look at something from two contrasting points of view and then come to a reasoned and well supported conclusion.

It is also important that you look closely at the number of marks that are awarded for each part of a question. This will give you guidance as to how long you should spend on each particular part. Some parts of a question will only gain you two or four marks while other questions will have sections worth eight and twelve marks.

Remember to look very closely at the precise wording of each part of a question. You need to make absolutely certain that your answer clearly relates to what is specifically required. For example, you may answer a question about inflation and write all you know about how it is measured, but the actual question asked required you to write about the difference between two causes of inflation, cost-push and demand-pull. Time management is crucial. Don’t spend too long on one question, or parts of one question, and then leave yourself towards the end of the examination with very little time to read through your answer and correct any mistakes and/or add anything that you feel is missing.

W herever possible, use diagrams to aid your explanations, but make sure that they are accurately and clearly drawn and correctly labelled. You should also make sure that you refer to them in your answer.

You should also try and bring in appropriate and relevant examples, wherever possible, of current economic issues and problems to support the points you are making. Look back at the question every so often, just to make sure that you are answering the question correctly and staying ‘on track’.

You do not need to write out the...
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