Lear Qoutes

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"Meantime we shall express our darker purpose."
- William Shakespeare, King Lear, 1.1.36
"Although the last, not least."
- William Shakespeare, King Lear, 1.1.85
"Nothing will come of nothing: speak again."
- William Shakespeare, King Lear, 1.1.92
"Come not between the dragon and his wrath."
- William Shakespeare, King Lear, 1.1.124
"Mend your speech a little,
Lest it may mar your fortunes."
- William Shakespeare, King Lear, 1.1.97
"I want that glib and oily art
To speak and purpose not; since what I well intend,
I'll do't before I speak."
- William Shakespeare, King Lear, 1.1.227
"A still-soliciting eye, and such a tongue
That I am glad I have not, though not to have it
Hath lost me in your liking."
- William Shakespeare, King Lear, 1.1.230
"Love is not love
When it is mingled with regards that stand
Aloof from the entire point."
- William Shakespeare, King Lear, 1.1.241
"Fairest Cordelia, that art most rich, being poor;
Most choice, forsaken; and most loved, despised!"
- William Shakespeare, King Lear, 1.1.253
"Time shall unfold what plaited cunning hides."
- William Shakespeare, King Lear, 1.1.302
"I grow, I prosper;
Now, gods, stand up for bastards!"
- William Shakespeare, King Lear, 1.2.21
"This is the excellent foppery of the world, that,
when we are sick in fortune,--often the surfeit
of our own behavior,--we make guilty of our
disasters the sun, the moon, and the stars: as
if we were villains by necessity; fools by
heavenly compulsion; knaves, thieves, and
treachers, by spherical predominance; drunkards,
liars, and adulterers, by an enforced obedience of
planetary influence; and all that we are evil in,
by a divine thrusting on: an admirable evasion
of whoremaster man, to lay his goatish
disposition to the charge of a star!"
- William Shakespeare, King Lear, 1.2.132
"Pat he comes, like the catastrophe of the old comedy; my cue is villanous melancholy, with a sigh like Tom o' Bedlam." - William Shakespeare, King Lear, 1.2.150
"Have more than thou showest,
Speak less than thou knowest,
Lend less than thou owest."
- William Shakespeare, King Lear, 1.4.132
"Who is it that can tell me who I am?"
- William Shakespeare, King Lear, 1.4.230
"Ingratitude, thou marble-hearted fiend,
More hideous, when thou show'st thee in a child,
Than the sea-monster."
- William Shakespeare, King Lear, 1.4.283
"How sharper than a serpent's tooth it is
To have a thankless child!"
- William Shakespeare, King Lear, 1.4.312
"Striving to better, oft we mar what's well."
- William Shakespeare, King Lear, 1.4.346
"O! let me not be mad, not mad, sweet heaven;
Keep me in temper; I would not be mad!"
- William Shakespeare, King Lear, 1.5.51
"Down, thou climbing sorrow!
Thy element's below."
- William Shakespeare, King Lear, 2.4.57
"O, sir! you are old;
Nature in you stands on the very verge
Of her confine."
- William Shakespeare, King Lear, 2.4.148
"Necessity's sharp pinch!"
- William Shakespeare, King Lear, 2.4.231
"O reason not the need! Our basest beggars
Are in the poorest thing superfluous.
Allow not nature more than nature needs,
Man's life is cheap as beast's."
- William Shakespeare, King Lear, 2.4.264
"You see me here, you gods, a poor old man,
As full of grief as age; wretched in both!"
- William Shakespeare, King Lear, 2.4.274
"Let not women's weapons, water-drops,
Stain my man's cheeks!"
- William Shakespeare, King Lear, 2.4.277
"Contending with the fretful elements;
Bids the wind blow the earth into the sea,
Or swell the curled waters 'bove the main,
That things might change or cease."
- William Shakespeare, King Lear, 3.1.4
"Blow, winds, and crack your cheeks! rage! blow!
You cataracts and hurricanoes, spout
Till you have drenched our steeples, drowned the cocks!
You sulphurous and thought-executing fires,
Vaunt-couriers to oak-cleaving thunderbolts,
Singe my white head! And thou, all-shaking thunder,
Strike flat the thick rotundity o' the world!...
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