Lean Six Sigma

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Coventry University Postgraduate Program

IFSM101EC - Lean and Six Sigma Analysis Tools and Techniques - 1112B

MBA in Engineering Management

Declaration:
The assignment submitted is a result of my own investigation and independent work. All sections of the text and results, which been obtained from other sources, are fully referenced. No confidential information of Infosys is included in this assignment. I understand that cheating and plagiarism constitute a breach of University regulations and will be dealt with as per prevailing university rules and regulations.

Name: Peterson Pius Chiramel
Enrolment Number: 4693804

Table of Contents
Part A1
3
Part B4
Summary5
Introduction6
1.0 Why Implement Lean…………………………………………………………………………………………………… 2.0. Current Manufacturing Facility…………………………………………………………………………………… 2.0.1. Value stream Mapping
2.0.2. Drawbacks of the current manufacturing facility
3.0. Lean Techniques
3.0.1. Develop one –piece Continuous Flow
3.0.2. Cell Creation
4.0. Future State Map
4.0.1. Supermarket Pull System
4.0.2. FIFO (First in First Out)
4.0.3. Pacemaker Process
4.0.4. Load Leveling
5.0. Implementation Plan
5.0.1. Breaking Implementation into steps
5.0.2. Objectives and Goals
6.0. Benefits
6.0.1. Lead Time
6.0.2. Labor Saving
6.0.3. Quality

7.0. Issues
7.0.1Reduce changeover time 6.0.2. Labor Saving
7.0.2. Commitment
7.0.3. Misconception
8.0. A3 Summary

Introduction
This literature review explores the three major sectors where lean and Six Sigma can be applied namely Manufacturing, Service and Government Agencies. Although many researches for Lean Six Sigma have taken place in these sectors, this literature review will cover the differences between the applications of lean techniques in these three sectors. Lean Principle was first implemented in manufacturing sector particularly automobile, by Toyota for mass automobile production. Lean was then known as the Toyota Production System (TPS). Soon Lean manufacturing and tools showed the impact in various regions, due to the dramatic improvement in profits, resource utilization, low inventory, product quality and mass production. The common goal for application of lean in any sector is to minimize wastes, optimize resource utilization, reduce inventory and improve product quality. The application of lean will differ in each sector depending upon the type of wastes, that particular sector produces. For example Toyota production systems have identified seven types of wastes in manufacturing: Over-production, Waiting, Processing, Transportation, Motion, Inventory and Re-work. This may not be the case in Service and public (government agencies) sectors. One more important difference to note is the inventory in all these sectors. In manufacturing, any product which is pending to be processed in the production line is an inventory. On the other hand, in service industry, for example a hospital, inventory here is the number of patients waiting. Thus we see that the approach used in manufacturing of minimizing inventories is not applicable in service industry. In Government agencies, inventory may the files which are to be processed, or citizens waiting to cast their vote. Unlike manufacturing where a huge investment is needed on machines and other resources, to implement automation, creation of cells, kaizen, Service industry and government agencies can works on intellectual capital, where most of the wastes comprise of waiting time for customers or citizens. This waiting time is found to easily reduce by some minor changes in the flow. For example for a particular process, an approval is needed wherein the only activity of the approver is to validate the form being processed, here this decision loop can be eliminated and the validation can be performed in the form itself, thus introducing kanban. So the organization or the government agency should...
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