Leader Follower Relationship

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COURSE: BUS 6030

COURSE DESCRIPTION: LEADERSHIP AND MANAGEMENT OF CHANGE

LECTURER: PROF. C. GETECHA

SEMESTER: FALL

YEAR: 2012

TERM PAPER: LEADER FOLLOWER RELATIONSHIPS

GROUP 4 MEMBERS NAMES: STUDENT ID No:
1. Stephen Omuga637854
2. Daisy Oria623319
3. Fredrick Njokih636057

Table of Contents
1.DYADIC THEORY4
1.1.Introduction4
1.2.Evolution of the Dyadic theory4
1.2.1.Vertical Dyad Linkage (VDL) Theory5
1.2.2.Leader–Member Exchange (LMX) Theory6
1.2.3.Team Building6
1.2.4.Systems and Networks6
1.3.An in-depth look at the theory as a whole7
1.3.1.The Influence of LMX on Follower Behavior8
1.3.2.The Three-Stage Process for Developing Positive LMX Relations9
1.3.3.Factors that Determine LMX Quality10
1.3.4.Effective Leader–Follower Feedback11
1.3.5.Limitations of LMX Theory Application11
1.3.6.Bias in LMX: Employee Career Implications12
2.FOLLOWERSHIP13
2.1.Critical factors affecting leader-follower relationships13
2.2.Effective follower types13
2.3.Guidelines to becoming an effective follower15
2.4.Determinants of follower influence16
2.4.1.Follower Relative Power Position16
2.4.2.Follower Locus of Control17
2.4.3.Follower Education and Experience17
2.5.Dual role of being a follower and a leader18
3.DELEGATION19
3.1.Benefits of Delegation19
3.2.Signs of delegating too little20
3.3.Delegation Decisions20
3.4.Delegating with the Use of a Model21

DYADIC THEORY
Introduction
Dyadic refers to the individualized relationship between a leader and each follower in a work unit.Dyadic theorists focus on the development and effects of separate dyadic relationships between leaders and followers. Dyadic theory is an approach to leadership that attempts to explain why leaders vary their behavior with different followers. The dyadic approach concentrates on the heterogeneity of dyadic relationships, arguing that a single leader will form different relationships with different followers. A central theme in dyadic leadership is the notion of “support for self-worth” that leaders provide to followers, and the return performance that followers provide to leaders. Support for self-worth is defined as a leader’s support for a follower’s actions and ideas; building follower’s confidence in his or her ability, integrity, and motivation; and paying attention to follower’s feelings and needs. Evolution of the Dyadic theory

As shown above, the four stages of evolution in the dyadic approach are vertical dyadic linkage theory (VDL), leader–member exchange theory (LMX), team building, and systems and networks theory. The first evolutionary stage (VDL) is the awareness of a relationship between a leader and a follower, ratherthan between a leader and a group of followers. The second stage (LMX) proposes that the quality of the relationship between a leader and a follower is an important determinant of how each follower will be treated. The third stage (team building) explores the relationship between the leader and the followers as a team concept rather than as a dyad, and the fourth stage (systems and networks) examines relationships at a much broader scale involving multiple levels and structural units within the organization. 1.

2.1.
2.2.
Vertical Dyad Linkage (VDL) Theory 
The vertical dyad approach is an evolutionary phase from individualized leadership research. Early research on individualized leadership focused on the traditional average leadership (ALS) approach, in which a leader applies the same style of leadership toward a group as a whole. The perception is that the leader/superior treats everyone the same. However, others describe another approach whereby the leader treats his or her followers differently. It is called the vertical dyad linkage approach. Vertical dyadic linkage (VDL) theory examines how...
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