Lcvp My Own Place Example

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  • Topic: Ruins, 2nd millennium, The Entrance, New South Wales
  • Pages : 5 (1193 words )
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  • Published : March 13, 2011
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My Own Place
dublin

Map showing location of Killbrittain


1. Introduction
Kilbrittain or Killbrittain (Irish: Cill Briotáin, meaning "Britton's church") is the name of a village, townland and parish in County Cork, Ireland. The village lies about 5 miles (8.0 km) southwest of Bandon, and near Clonakilty and Kinsale. The coastal route around the edge of the parish is the R600. The village itself is around 1.5 kilometres inland from the coast.

Today is a thriving community. The town boasts about is huge succession in the past and to date in G.A.A and hurling. They have one the county final four times in a row undefeated by any opponent. The sports clubs offer a wide range of activties for people and is open to new members to join the G.A.A team and the hurling team freely. The town has many historical sites. It can be seen seen from the North (present day main entrance), atop the hill from the South, then from the North West through the old Church and Graveyard and finally the ruined lodge house, or sentry post (of which there are two) at the former entrance to the Castle from the South. The Castle is thought to date from 1035 where the original fortress may have been built by the O'Mahony Clan. Known to have been in the hands of de Courceys and possibly extended in the 13th Century, Kilbrittain Castle is said to have been the principal seat of MacCarthy Reagh from the early 15th century. The Castle was extensively restored and enlarged by the Stawell family in the 18th and 19th centuries, it was partially burned in 1920 and restored in 1969 by inventor Russell Winn. Kilbrittain Castle is now the home of the Cahill-O'Brien family. Historical Sites


Kilbrittain Castle
It can be seen seen from the North (present day main entrance), atop the hill from the South, then from the North West through the old Church and Graveyard and finally the ruined lodge house, or sentry post (of which there are two) at the former entrance to the Castle from the South. The Castle is thought to date from 1035 where the original fortress may have been built by the O'Mahony Clan. Known to have been in the hands of de Courceys and possibly extended in the 13th Century, Kilbrittain Castle is said to have been the principal seat of MacCarthy Reagh from the early 15th century. The Castle was extensively restored and enlarged by the Stawell family in the 18th and 19th centuries, it was partially burned in 1920 and restored in 1969 by inventor Russell Winn. Kilbrittain Castle is now the home of the Cahill-O'Brien family.

The ruins of Kilbrittain Church
Thought to have been intact and possibly still in use around 1615, although in ruins by 1699. The church is situated North East of Kilbrittain village in a rectangular graveyard on a South facing slope, the graveyard is still occasionally used. The ruined church and graveyard overlook the village to the South West.



The ruins of Gortnahorna House
Situated about 1km North West of Kilbrittain village on a South East facing slope. This two storey country house also had cellars and it was L-shaped in plan with approx seven bays. The second image shows the tall distinctive sidelights to the left and right of the main entrance doorway and first floor windows. The remains of a fireplace on the first floor can be seen left of centre. Apparently the house was burned during the War of Independence about 1920 and subsequently restored. Sometime around 1940 Gortnahorna House was stripped of its slate, stone and glass and thus began its fall into ruin. On the third image are the remains of some out offices, most likely stables, and finally the well preserved "Round Pillar", which once adorned the entrance to Barleyfield Estate. 

Aims & Scope of the Investigation
As an LCVP group we set out to investigate the local area under eight specific categories: 1. Heritage
2. Sources of Employment
3. Financial Institutions
4. The Provision of Social Services
5. Community Development Groups...
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