Lawsuit Memo

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To: Client
From: Accounting Firm
Re: Lawsuit
Pending lawsuits against a company are both expensive and detrimental to a company’s image. The decision to understand the implications of a lawsuit to the company is the first step in minimizing risk and potential loss to the organization. Research was conducted based on the guidelines of the FASB to answer the client’s questions pertaining to the lawsuit. The memo provided to the client will answer the following questions: How are requirements for contingencies reported? What would happen to the financial statements if the client loses the lawsuit? Will the client’s debt be forgiven if the mortgage is refinanced or if their mortgage will be refinanced if they file Chapter 11? How will the treatment on the financial statement be resolved? How will the reparations of the patent be treated on the financial statements as a result of losing the lawsuit? To report requirements for contingencies and explain the financial statements consequences if the client loses the lawsuit. When dealing with a lawsuit, a company must know whether or not to consider contingencies. According to Schroeder, Clark, and Cathey (2005), a contingency is a possible future event that could perhaps have possible implications on the firm. The four most common contingency methods: Pending lawsuits

Income tax disputes
Notes receivable discounted
Accommodation endorsements
This company is dealing with a pending lawsuit. When a gain is possible, it should not be recorded on the financial statement until the gain actually occurs. When a loss is possible, it is recorded when loss is expected to occur. The Financial Accounting Standard Board breaks down three criteria to determine when a loss should be recorded. A company must first consider if there is a likelihood of a loss. The three levels or potential risk related...
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