Lawn Tennis

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  • Topic: Tennis, Tennis court, Real tennis
  • Pages : 6 (1728 words )
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  • Published : January 18, 2012
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Lawn Tennis

A Research Paper Presented to
Mrs.Nora May H. Cubal
Mati School of Art and Trades
City of Mati Davao Oriental

SY:2011-2012

In Partial Fulfillment
Of the Requirement in
English IV

Presented by
Junave N. ceballos
IV-Quezon
I-Introduction
Thanks to the wide coverage that television and other media gives to the game, tennis is now one of the most popular sports. How does one define the game? It is a game played with racquets and a light ball between two players. The players stand on opposite sides of a net placed in the center on a rectangular court that may be made of grass, clay or asphalt. It can also be played between two teams of two players. Racquetball, a variation of the game, is played in an indoor court with a specially marked floor and high walls off which the ball must be played. Tennis has a long history, and according to records available, its establishment can be traced to two separate incidents. In 1859, Major Thomas Henry Gem, a solicitor, and his friend Batista Pereira, a Spanish merchant, were living in Birmingham, England, and played a game that they termed "pelota" after a Spanish ball game. It was played on a lawn. This later came to be known as tennis, and in 1874 they formed the Leamington Tennis Club, which laid out the rules of the game. It was on 23 July 1884 that the first tennis tournament was held on the grounds of Shrubland Hall. Meanwhile, in December 1873, Major Walter Clopton Wingfield devised a similar game to entertain his guests at a party on his estate in Wales. It is believed that his version was adapted from an older sport of indoor tennis or royal tennis that had been invented in 12th century France. The world tennis comes from the French word "tenez," an imperative form of the verb "tenir" which means "to hold." This, apparently, was a cry used by the player who was about to serve the ball. The players or the teams, depending on whether it is a "singles" or a "doubles" match, stand on opposite sides of the net. One player is the server and the opposing player is the receiver. The server serves the ball, which is returned by the receiver. The ball has to go over the net into the service court opposite the server's. If the ball hits the net but lands in the service court, it is a void service. The server then gets a second chance. A proper service starts a rally in which the players alternate hitting the ball across the net. The first player or team that fails to return the ball loses the point.

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II-Definition of Terms

1. action: Synonym for spin.
2. ad court: Left side of the court of each player, so called because the "ad" ("advantage") point immediately following a deuce is always served from this side of the court. 3. advantage: When one player wins the first point from a deuce and needs one more point to win the game; not applicable when using deciding points. 4. advantage set: Set won by a player/team having won at least six games with a two-game advantage over the opponent(s). Final sets in the singles draws of the Australian Open, the French Open, Wimbledon, and the tennis Olympic event, as well as the Davis Cup, are all advantage sets. 5. all: Used by the chair umpire to announce scores when both players have the same number of points or the same number of games: 30–all (30–30), 15–all (15–15), two games all, four games all, etc. When both players are at 40, the preferred term is deuce. 6. all-court: Style of play that is a composite of all the different playing styles, which includes baseline, transition, and serve and volley styles. 7. backhand: Stroke in which the ball is hit with the back of the racquet hand facing the ball at the moment of contact. A backhand is often hit by a right-handed player when the ball is on the left side of the court, and vice versa. 8....
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