Law in Australian Society

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  Introduction
 
  Injury
 in
 the
 course
 of
 employment
 places
 significant
 stress
 on
 both
 the
 employee
 and
 employer,
 Section
 8(1)
 of
  the
 Occupational
 Health
 a
 Safety
 Act
 2000
 (NSW),
 states
 ‘an
 employer
 must
 ensure
 the
 health
 safety
 and
 welfare
  at
 work
 of
 all
 employees
 of
 the
 employer’
 whilst
 also
 providing
 a
 level
 of
 risk
 assessment.
 The
 statutory
 scheme
  of
 enforcing
 employers
 to
 hold
 workers
 compensation
 insurance
 enables
 insurance
 company’s
 to
 hold
  employers
 accountable
 for
 workers
 safety
 under
 the
 Work
 Health
 and
 Safety
 Act
 2011
 (NSW),
 the
 Act
 holds
 both
  the
 employer
 and
 the
 employee
 responsible
 for
 their
 actions
 and
 safety
 in
 the
 workplace .
 
 
  The
 scheme
 is
 in
 place
 to
 benefit
 and
 protect
 parties
 from
 deprivation
 as
 a
 result
 of
 workplace
 injury.
  Entitlements
 awarded
 to
 employees
 protect
 them
 and
 their
 dependents
 by
 way
 of
 wage
 payments,
 access
 to
  medical
 benefits
 and/or
 job
 security
 in
 exchange
 for
 mandatory
 relinquishment
 of
 employees
 right
 to
 sue
 an
  employer
 under
 civil
 or
 tort
 law,
 thus
 providing
 the
 employer
 with
 immunity
 from
 legal
 action,
 saving
 time,
  money
 and
 reputation .
 
 
  Role
 of
 the
 High
 Court
 and
 New
 South
 Wales
 Court
 of
 Appeal
  Over
 the
 last
 decade
 judgments
 handed
 down
 by
 the
 High
 Court
 and
 New
 South
 Wales
 Court
 of
 Appeal
 have
  outlined
 the
 capacity
 for
 which
 we
 define
 a
 worker
 or
 contractor.
 The
 HCA
 and
 NSWCA
 looked
 at
 the
 practice
 of
  the
 parties
 rather
 than
 the
 employment
 contract
 to
 determine
 who
 has
 the
 right
 of
 control.
 The
 courts
 today
  cite
 greatly
 the
 judgments
 of
 previous
 employment
 law
 cases
 to
 develop
 a
 level
 of
 consistency
 in
 employment
  law
 cases,
 In
 
 Sweeney
 v
 Boylan
 Nominees
 Pty
 Ltd
 (2006)
 HCA
 19
 the
 High
 Court
 held
 there
 was
 no
 vicarious
  liability
 for
 negligence
 by
 the
 respondent
 to
 the
 appellant,
 who
 was
 injured
 due
 to
 an
 independent
 contractor’s
  negligence
 as
 it
 concluded
 that
 the
 worker
 was
 independent
 of
 the
 respondent .
 
 
  The
 appellant
 brought
 action
 against
 the
 respondent
 after
 suffering
 injury’s
 when
 a
 service
 station
 refrigerator
  door
 fell
 on
 her
 as
 she
 attempted
 to
 open
 it,
 the
 refrigerator
 door
 had
 been
 serviced
 hours
 prior
 to
 the
 accident
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