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Langston Hughes

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Brendan Dolan
Prof. Van Den Berg
English 203
12/10/12
Langston Hughes is known as one of the most memorable African-American writers of the twentieth century. He was a prolific writer of poetry, novels, and short stories and had part in writing stage plays as well as being a columnist. He had died in the mid-sixties do to prostate cancer but he had left behind legacy in American Literature and inspired the black community during the civil rights movement.

As well as being a notable successful writer, he played a vital role to instill racial pride in the African-American communities, to put an end to harsh segregation. He wanted Blacks to have just as much of an equal right as white people had. Although, he was also a mixed lineage of races, he was Black, Jewish, Native American and number of others, but it was his image as a black man that played the big part. His writings centered on the real life struggles of black people in the country. Everything from being arrested by sitting in the front of a bus or even black children not being educated, he used his writing to make everyone understand that racism and segregation is what is truly separating our society apart and that nothing good or positive is to ever come out of it, it will only drive us farther apart. He told us his perception of how we live is negative and literal but to hopefully see and end in sight. The stories he had written were used to bring about the current status of race relations to the people of America. But one other vital role that Langston had a part in was The Harlem Renaissance. He created this movement as one of the earliest examples of ratification toward the black community. Although it was mainly a literary movement, it helped blacks become more involved in music, art, theatre. Even in politics which helped support the black community where it counts. Hughes became the first voice of the African- American people. He saw America as an opportunistic country but blind of any...