Langston Hughes' Harlem: Dream Deferred

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Langston Hughes' Harlem:Dream Deferred
An analysis of Hughes' Harlem [Dream Deffered]; How black people are kept down in society. In Hughes' Harlem [Dream Deferred], at least to me, it seems as though he is "talking" from the perspective of a local from the Harlem Renaissance, who finally has the ability to dream of a better life, but not achieve it. The problem was that many of these people's ideas of the time was just that; dreams could be easily made, and never made to come true. It sounds like Hughes is trying to explain how a person trapped in this world may be able to put away his dreams and deal with that fact with simile. Hughes relates different coping methods to things such as body wounds.

If one can't ever actualize their dream, does it dry up? As in does it fade away into nothing and never bother anyone ever again? Maybe it shrivels like a raisin, damaged and old, but the essence still intact? Then there is the line about festering like a sore. This could be taken as a dream that just sits there but never receives the attention it needs will never quite go away. The dream will constantly sit there like an itch on your arm always making you think about it while doing everything else. Or maybe it crusts over syrupy sweet, as in putting on a protective façade to cover the fact that there is hurt underneath. Or perhaps the dream sags one down like a heavy load, never allowing the person to ever finally accept what they have to do in life, what they won't be able to do, and to move on. Then there is the concept that the dream may explode; separating into a million separate ideas, with such force that everyone in contact with the person is affected by those ideas.
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