Labour Relations

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Llewellyn E. Van Zyl
13156217
BSOP 311

Index

NrPage

1.)The Roll Of Trade Unions………………………………..........2
1.1) Introduction……………………………………………….2
1.2) What Is a Trade Union…………………………………..2
1.3) Why Unions Develop in Society………………….........3
1.4) Why Do People Join Trade Unions…………………….5
1.5) Functions Of A Trade Union……………………………6
1.6) What is the Structure of a Trade Union………………..6
1.7) The Shop Steward……………………………………….8
1.8) Trade Union Federations………………………….........9
1.8.1) COSATU…………………………………………10
1.8.2) FEDUSA…………………………………………10
1.8.3) NACTU…………………………………….........11

2.)Qualities of a Good Negotiator………………………….........12
2.1) Characteristics of a Negotiator…………………………14

3.)Workplace Forums………………………………………..........17
3.1) The Current Position…………………………………….18

4.)Procedural Aspects during a disciplinary enquiry……....20
4.1) Adequate Notice…………………………………………21
4.2) The enquiry must precede the decision……………….21
4.3) The hearing must be timeous…………………………..22
4.4) The employee must be informed of the charge(s)……22
4.5) The employee should be present at the hearing……..22
4.6) The employee must be permitted representation ……23
4.7) The employee must be allowed to call witnesses……23
4.8) Disciplinary Records…………………………………….23
4.9) The presiding officer should be impartial……………...23
4.10) Right To Appeal………………………………………….24
4.11) Article - by Derek Jackson………………………………26

5.) Bibliography……………………………………………………...34

1)The roll of Trade Unions
1.1)Introduction

In this foremost fraction of this paper we will look at the roll and functions of trade unions (and trade federations) in the 21st Century. I will strive towards highlighting the primary as well as the secondary functions over and above the average view of a Trade union.

1.2)What is a Trade union?

Lets first look at what exactly constitutes a trade union. Salamon (1998, p. 85) defined a trade union as any organization, whose membership consists of employees, which seeks to organize and represent their interests both in the workplace and society and in particular , seeks to regulate the employment relationship through the direct process of collective bargaining with management

This definition is supported by Finnemore & Van Rensberg (2002, p.135), the defined a trade union as a continuous association of wage earners for the purpose of maintaining or improving the conditions of their working lives. This is a much more blinkered definition because it doesn’t include the processes through which they handle disputes.

However, in South Africa a much broader definition must be used. Ne. et. al. (2006, p.40) tends to capture the essence of South African trade unions when he states, that a trade union os regarded as a continuing permanent organization created by the workers to protect themselves at their work, to improve the conditions of their work through collective bargaining, to seek to better the conditions of their lives and to provide a means of expression for the workers’ views on matters of society.

From these definitions it’s clear that trade unions act on behalf of their members, they engage in collective bargaining to satisfy the underlying needs of its members. They are membership organizations which functions on the principle, that the more members they have, the more power they have in the workplace.

This leads us to the question, Why do Unions develop in society?

1.3)Why Unions Develop in Society

When an organization employs labour, a hierarchy of authority is created. This means that the employees now have to work in a formal setting, with a specific managerial style which they have to adhire to. Human nature indicates that when any person is subjected...
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