Kubla Khan-C.a

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Sometimes, a poem is celebrated not for the story it tells, but for how it is told. Some poems are famous simply because of the way they are told: the elaborate, vivid language used to describe places and sights. “Kubla Khan or A Vision in a Dream” by Samuel Taylor Coleridge is one such poem. Written in 1798, it is a poem that uses intricate language to portray a vision or dream that Coleridge had. Coleridge claimed that the poem was written in an opium-induced haze, which is something that can be implied by the poem's subtitle, A Vision in a Dream. This poem is essentially about nothing; it is enthralling due to its language and feeling rather than any specific message. The lines of the poem Kubla Khan sound like a chant and helps suggest mystery, supernatural, and mystical themes. The language used is expressive enough that you can yourself envision the place Coldridge dreamed of. It is a lyrical poem in four stanzas, told in iambic pentameter. In the first two lines, Coleridge describes the "pleasure dome" in Xanadu. In Xanadu did Kubla Khan a stately pleasure dome decree Kubla Khan did not merely order, but decree that a "stately pleasure dome" be built. This dome is evidence of how unnatural or unreal the place of Xanadu is it has a ruler who ignores the unpleasantness that can be found in life. He uses his vocabulary to challenge and tease the imagination into seeing what he saw in his dream. In Xanadu, there are not small streams, but "sinuous rills" and wall and towers do not enclose the gardens but are girdled round'. Coleridge's use of language helps to convey and interrupt the extent of his imagination. In the poem Kubla Khan, imagery is also important for Coleridge to show his imagination to the reader. There are images of paradise throughout the poem that are combined with references to darker, more evil places such as hell. On example of this is the "demon...
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